Gathering it All In

 

I have a Voya article out this month! The online version can be found here; turn to page 28.

Have you registered yet for JCLC? The 2nd annual conference will be held in Kansas City, MO from 19-23 September.

JCLC brings together a diverse group of librarians, library staff, library supporters, and community participants to explore issues of diversity in libraries and how they affect the ethnic communities who use our services. JCLC is a unique and unparalleled opportunity for participants to share successes, opportunities, and challenges while networking and attending cutting-edge programs on pressing issues affecting both librarians and communities of color. The conference includes speakers, skills building workshops, research based panels, networking opportunities and exhibits. In addition, JCLC deepens connections across constituencies and beyond, and unifies and strengthens the voices of each association.

Why is it no longer possible to change font color on WordPress?

From Sociological Images, an eye-opening look at how the world is shown to us.

Gecko Press  is a New Zealand Press that translates international books from many different countries into English. A really interesting selection of books from a range of genres and cultures.  Their site says that some of their books are distributed by Lerner in the U.S.   http://www.geckopress.co.nz/

Indian Converts Collection  First published in 1727, the remarkable book “Indian Converts, or Some account of the lives and dying speeches of a considerable number of the Christianized Indians of Martha’s Vineyard” is now available in full online. Written by Experience Mayhew, the book provides remarkable insights into the lives and culture of four generations of Native Americans in colonial America. This digitized version was created at Reed College, and visitors can look through all four sections of the work, which include “Indian Ministers” and “Pious Children.” Throughout the work, Mayhew details the books that different age groups were reading, provides insights into early New England pedagogy and childrearing practices, and also describes each individual in terms of their own genealogy and personal history. The truly fantastic thing about the site is that it also contains an archive with over 600 images and documents that further contextualize the work. Also, the site contains study guides designed for classroom use that cover artifact analysis, genealogy, and reading gravestones (from AIALA)

 Jamie Campbell Naidoo writes about using the many wonderful Pura Belpre Award winners in your library programming.

“Established in 1996 by the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking (REFORMA) and the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), the Pura Belpré Award recognizes Latino authors and illustrators “whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth.” The award’s namesake, the first Puerto Rican librarian in the New York Public Library system, was dedicated to bringing rich stories imbued with Latino cultural elements to the children and youth that she served in barrios and ethnically diverse neighborhoods throughout the city from the 1920s and 1930s and later in the 1960s and 1970s. In 2011, the Pura Belpré Award celebrated its quinceanera, marking fifteen years of works that carry on the mission first started by that energetic and visionary librarian so long ago.”

 

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