June Releases

Posted on 1 June 2015 Monday


June release for Middle Grade and Young Adult readers by authors of color.

2013: 7
2014: 5
2015: 9

Trollhunters by Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus; Disney-Hyperion
This new 320-page horror novel written by Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus is about monsters that move in unseen places and the resurgence of a 45-year-old mystery that threatens the seemingly sleepy city of San Bernardino, CA.

Ink and Ashes by Valynne Maerani; Tu Books
Claire Takata has never known much about her father, who passed away ten years ago. But on the anniversary of his death, she finds a letter from her deceased father to her stepfather. Before now, Claire never had a reason to believe they even knew each other. Struggling to understand why her parents kept this surprising history hidden, Claire combs through anything that might give her information about her father . . . until she discovers that he was a member of the yakuza, a Japanese organized crime syndicate. The discovery opens a door that should have been left closed. The race to outrun her father’s legacy reveals secrets of his past that cast ominous shadows, threatening Claire, her friends and family, her newfound love, and ultimately her life. Winner of Tu Books’ New Visions Award, Ink and Ashes is a fascinating debut novel packed with romance, intrigue, and heart-stopping action. (ages 12 and up)

The Dragon King by A. Yuan; Mithras
Safire has lived within a community of dragons for five years, ever since a band of raiders wiped out her village. When the King of Argrisia declares war on all remaining dragons, her community is forced to flee and she finds herself traveling with a small band of warriors to seek an oracle. Each of the five companions has their own secrets, which are revealed one by one as they travel. Safire finds that she is a changeling and has already developed the ability to transform into a dragon at will. When they reach the oracle, Safire is told that she may play a role in bringing the burgeoning conflict between dragons and humans to a peaceful conclusion. But her first step will be convincing her companions she can still be trusted in spite of her frightening abilities. Over the course of their journey to the dragon king’s mountain home on the orders of the oracle, all five travelers become united in their desire to see peace restored in the Midlands. But even peace will require sacrifice. 9ages 14 and up)

Make it Messy by Marcus Samuelsson and Veronica Chambers; Delacorte
Marcus Samuelsson’s life and his journey to the top of the food world have been anything but typical. Orphaned in Ethiopia, he was adopted by a loving couple in Sweden, where his new grandmother taught him to cook and inspired in him a lifelong passion for food. In time, that passion would lead him to train and cook in some of the finest, most demanding kitchens in Europe. Samuelsson’s talent and ambition eventually led him to fulfill his dream of opening his own restaurant in New York City: Red Rooster Harlem, a highly acclaimed, multicultural dining room, where presidents rub elbows with jazz musicians, aspiring artists, and bus drivers. A place where anyone can feel at home. (ages 12 and up)

Shadowshaper by Daniel Jose Older; Arthur A. Levine
Sierra Santiago planned an easy summer of making art and hanging out with her friends. But then a corpse crashes the first party of the season. Her stroke-ridden grandfather starts apologizing over and over. And when the murals in her neighborhood begin to weep real tears… Well, something more sinister than the usual Brooklyn ruckus is going on. With the help of a fellow artist named Robbie, Sierra discovers shadowshaping, a thrilling magic that infuses ancestral spirits into paintings, music, and stories. But someone is killing the shadowshapers one by one — and the killer believes Sierra is hiding their greatest secret. Now she must unravel her family’s past, take down the killer in the present, and save the future of shadowshaping for generations to come.
Full of a joyful, defiant spirit and writing as luscious as a Brooklyn summer night, Shadowshaper introduces a heroine and magic unlike anything else in fantasy fiction, and marks the YA debut of a bold new voice.

Delicate Monsters by Stephanie Kuehn; St. Martin’s Griffin
When nearly killing a classmate gets seventeen-year-old Sadie Su kicked out of her third boarding school in four years, she returns to her family’s California vineyard estate. Here, she’s meant to stay out of trouble. Here, she’s meant to do a lot of things. But it’s hard. She’s bored. And when Sadie’s bored, the only thing she likes is trouble.
Emerson Tate’s a poor boy living in a rich town, with his widowed mother and strange, haunted little brother. All he wants his senior year is to play basketball and make something happen with the girl of his dreams. That’s why Emerson’s not happy Sadie’s back. An old childhood friend, she knows his worst secrets. The things he longs to forget. The things she won’t ever let him.
Haunted is a good word for fifteen-year-old Miles Tate. Miles can see the future, after all. And he knows his vision of tragic violence at his school will come true, because his visions always do. That’s what he tells the new girl in town. The one who listens to him. The one who recognizes the darkness in his past. (ages 14-18)

Rid wit’ Me Part 2 by Joy Deja King; A King Production Presents A Young Diamond Book
The Romeo and Juliet of the streets are back in Ride Wit’ Me part 2. Mercedes and Dalvin are fighting to keep their love intact and make it down the isle. Will the two lovebirds be able to overcome their obstacles and finally become husband and wife? Find out in this next installment.

Dork Diaries 9: Tales From A Not So Dorky Drama Queen by Rachel Renée Russell; Aladdin
Nikki’s diary is up to the month of April, and springtime is sure to bring more wacky adventures with Nikki and her friends Chloe, Zoey, and Brandon! (ages 9-13)

More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera; Soho Teen
The Leteo Institute’s revolutionary memory-relief procedure seems too good to be true to Aaron Soto — miracle cure-alls don’t tend to pop up in the Bronx projects. But Aaron can’t forget how he’s grown up poor or how his friends aren’t always there for him. Like after his father committed suicide in their one bedroom apartment. Aaron has the support of his patient girlfriend, if not necessarily his distant brother and overworked mother, but it’s not enough.
Then Thomas shows up. He has a sweet movie-watching setup on his roof, and he doesn’t mind Aaron’s obsession with a popular fantasy series. There are nicknames, inside jokes. Most importantly, Thomas doesn’t mind talking about Aaron’s past. But Aaron’s newfound happiness isn’t welcome on his block. Since he’s can’t stay away from Thomas or suddenly stop being gay, Aaron must turn to Leteo to straighten himself out, even if it means forgetting who he is. (ages 12-18)

 

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Posted in: Me Being Me