Booklist 2014/2015

Booklist 2014
Young adult fiction and non-fiction written by Asian American, Latino, African American and Native American authors. Unless otherwise indicated, annotations are taken from entries on Worldcat.

Use the following list to access a WordDoc with hyperlinks. Booklist 2014

JANUARY
Fake ID by Lamar Giles; Amistad
Breaking Point Article 5 books 2 by Kristen Simmons; Tor Teens
Beware of Boys Charley’s Epic Fiasco Book 4 by Kelli London; Kensington
Bird by Crystal Chan; Atheneum Books for Young Readers MG
The Blossoming Universe of Violet Diamond by Brenda Woods; Nancy Paulsen Books (Penguin)
STAT #5: Most Valuable (Stat: Standing Tall and Talented); Amar’e Stoudemire; Scholastic MG
When I was the Greatest by Jason Reynolds; Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Secrets of the Terra-Cotta Soldier by Ying Chang Compestine, Vinson Compestine; Amulet Books
Catfish by Nina Foxx; Brown Girl Publishing
How I Discovered Poetry by Marilyn Nelson; Dial Books
Gold Medal Winter by Donna Freitas; Arthur A. Levine
Hidden Girl: The True Story of a Modern-Day Child Slave by Shyima Hall, Lisa Wysocky; Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers
Diamonds & Deceit (At Somerton) by Leila Rasheed; Hyperion

FEBRUARY
Game World by C. J. Farley; Akashic/Black Sheep
Willow by Tonya Cherie Hegamin; Candlewick
Feral Curse by Cynthia Leitich Smith; Candlewick
Three (Arictle 5) by Kristen Simmons; Tor Teen
The Eternity Cure (Blood of Eden Series) by Julie Kagawa; Harlequin Teen
Saving Kabul Corner by N. H. Senzai; Simon and Schuster
Ignite Me by Tahereh Mafi

MARCH
I Lived On Butterfly Hill by Marjorie Agosin; Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Abby Spencer Goes to Bollywood by Varsha Bajaj; Albert Whitman and Company
Dust of Eden by Mariko Nagai; Albert Whitman and Company
Alpha Goddess by Amalie Howard; Sky Pony Press
Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle; HMH Books for Young Readers
Promise of Shadows by Justine Ireland; Simon and Schuster
The Secret Side of Empty by Maria Andreu; Running Press Kids
Hope is a Ferris Wheel by Robin Herrera; Abrams
Black Sheep by Na’ma B. Roberts; Francis Lincoln Children’s Books
Saving Baby Doe by Danette Vigilante
Crossover by Kwame Alexander; HMH

APRIL
Danny Blackgoat Rugged Road to Freedom by Tim Tingle; 7th Generation
Son Who Returns by Gary Robinson; 7th Generation
A Matter of Souls by Denise Lewis Patrick; Carolrhoda Press
Point by Brandy Colbert; Putnam Juvenile
To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han; Simon and Schuster
Promise of Shadows by Justina Ireland; Simon and Schuster
Prom Ever After: Haute Date\Save the Last Dance\Prom and Circumstance by Dona Sarkar, Caridad Ferrer; Deidre Berry (Kimani Tru)
The Interrogation of Ashala Wolf by Ambelin Kwaymullina; Candlewick
Snip Ship Revenge by Medeia Sharif; Evernight Publishing
Guys, Lies and Alibi (Langdon Prep) by Kimberly Reid; Kensington Press

MAY
Truth or Dare (Rumor Central #4) by Reshonda Tate Billingsley; Kensington
Cat Person by Seo Kim; Koyama Press
The Great Greene Heist by Varian Johnson; Arthur A. Levine
A Time to Dance by Padma Venkatraman; Nancy Paulsen Books
This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki; First Second Press
Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour; Dutton Books
One Man Guy by Michael Barakiva; Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Can You See Me Now? by Estela Bernal; Pinata Books (Arte Publico)

JUNE
The Truth Against the World by Sarah Jamila Stevenson; Flux
Summer of Yesterday by Gaby Triana; Simon Pulse
Rivals in the City: A Mary Quinn Mystery by Y. S. Lee; Walker Books
Complicit by Stephanie Kuehn; St. Martin’s Griffin
Tales From A Not-So-Glam TV Star (Dork Diaries) by Rachel Renée Russell; Aladdin
Lightfinder by Aaron Paquette; Kegedonce Press

JULY
Pig Park by Claudia Guadalupe Martinez; Cinco Puntos
The Shadow Hero:by Gene Luen Yang, Sonny Liew; First Second Press
Midnight Thief by Livia Blackburne; Disney Hyperion
Falling Into Place; by Amy Zhang; Greenwillow Press
Let’s Get Lost by Adi Alsaid; Harlequin Teen
Put Your Diamonds Up (Hollywood High) by NiNi Simone and Amir Abrams; K Teen Press
The Vast and Brutal Sea (The Vicious Deep) by Zoraida Cordova; Sourbooks Fire

AUGUST
Bombay Blues by Tanuja Desai Hidier; Push
I Remember Beirut by Zeina Abirached; Graphic Universe
Kinda Like Brothers by Coe Booth; Scholastic MG
Knockout Games by Greg Neri; Carolrhoda Books
The Turtles of Oman by Naomi Shihab Nye MG
A Blind Spot for Boys by Justina Chen
A New Beginning: My Journey with Addy by Denise Lewis Patrick, American Girl MG
The Problem with being Slightly Heroic by Uma Krishnaswami; Atheneum Books MG
The Zero Degree Zombie Zone by Patrick Henry Bass and Jerry Craft; Scholastic
Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson; Nancy Paulsen Books
The Girl From the Well by Rin Chupeco; Sourcebook Fire
Alvin Ho: Allergic to the Great Wall, the Forbidden Palace, and Other Tourist Attractions by Lenore Look; Schwartz and Wade
I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up and Changed the World (Young Readers Edition) by Malala Yousafzai with Particia McCormick; Little Brown
Escape from Lucien (Amulet series) by Kazu Kibuishi; Scholastic/Graphix
Lovers and Haters A Coleman High Novel #1 by Calvin Slater; Kensington

SEPTEMBER
Dork Diaries 8: Tales from a Not-So-Happily Ever After by Rachel Renee Russell; Aladdin
Half a World Away by Cynthia Kadohata; Atheneum
The Only Thing to Fear by Caroline Tung Richmond; Scholastic
How It Went Down by  Kekla Magoon; Henry Holt and Co.
On A Clear Day by Walter Dean Myers; Crown Books for Young Readers
The Red Pencil by Andrea Davis Pinkney; Scholastic Press
The Madman of Piney Woods by Christopher Paul Curtis; Scholastic
The Unstoppable Octobia May by Sharon G. Flake; Scholastic
Billy Buckhorn Abnormal by Gary Robinson
Falling Into Place by Amy Zhang; Greenwillow
Love is the Drug by Alaya Dawn Johnson; Arthur A. Levine
The Secret Sky: A Novel of Forbidden Love in Afghanistan by Atia Abawi; Philomel
No Name by Tim Tingle; 7th Generation
Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero; Cinco Puntos Press
You’re all I Want For Christmas by Earl Sewell, Candid Ferrer and Deidre Berry; Kimani Tru
Ashes to Ashes by Jenny Han and Sioban Vivan; Simon and Schuster
Tales from a Not So Happily Ever After (Dork Diaries) by Rachel Renee Russell; Alladin
OCTOBER
Tell Me Again How A Crush Should Feel by Sara Farizan; Algonquin
Make Something of It by Stephanie Perry Moore; Lerner Group
On The Other Side of the Bridge by Ray Villareal; Arte Publico Press
Dreaming in Indian: Contemorary Native American Voices edited by Mary Beth Leatherdale; Annick Press
In the Forbidden City by Chin Kwong-chiu, translated by Ben Want; China Insitute
Talon by Julie Kagawa; Harlequin Teen

NOVEMBER
Low Riders in Space (Book 1) by Cahter Campber, illus by Raul Gonzalez; Chronicle Books
Until the Day Arrives by Ana Maria Machado, trans by Jane Springer; Groundwood
Caught Up by Amir Abrams; KTeen
The Perfect Place by Theresa E. Harris; Clarion Books

DECEMBER
Lights, Love and Lip Gloss by Amir Abrams and Ni Ni Simone; K-Teen

2015

JANUARY
Emeralds and Ashes by Leila Rasheed; Disney Hyperion
The onset of war touches every member of the Somerton household as Lord Averley, then Sebastian Templeton, both enlist, and Rose Averley is trapped in Egypt while on her honeymoon with Duke of Huntly.

The Boy in the Black Suit by Jason Reynolds; Atheneum
Soon after his mother’s death, Matt takes a job at a funeral home in his tough Brooklyn neighborhood and, while attending and assisting with funerals, begins to accept her death and his responsibilities as a man.

X:A Novel by Ilyash Shabazz and Kekla Magoon; Candlewick
Malcolm Little’s parents have always told him that he can achieve anything, but from what he can tell, that’s a pack of lies—after all, his father’s been murdered, his mother’s been taken away, and his dreams of becoming a lawyer have gotten him laughed out of school. There’s no point in trying, he figures, and lured by the nightlife of Boston and New York, he escapes into a world of fancy suits, jazz, girls, and reefer. But Malcolm’s efforts to leave the past behind lead him into increasingly dangerous territory. Deep down, he knows that the freedom he’s found is only an illusion—and that he can’t run forever.

X follows Malcolm from his childhood to his imprisonment for theft at age twenty, when he found the faith that would lead him to forge a new path and command a voice that still resonates today.

Stella by Starlight by Shapon Draper; Atheneum
When a burning cross set by the Klan causes panic and fear in 1932 Bumblebee, North Carolina, fifth-grader Stella must face prejudice and find the strength to demand change in her segregated town.

Chasing Freedom : The Life Journeys Of Harriet Tubman And Susan B. Anthony, Inspired By Historical Facts by Nikki Grimes and Michele Wood; Orchard Books
In this imaginative biographical story, Harriet Tubman and Susan B. Anthony sit down over a cup of tea in 1904 to reminisce about their struggles and triumphs in the service of freedom and women’s rights.

Streetball Crew Book One: Sasquatch in the Paint by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar; Disney Hyperion
Theo Rollins is starting eighth grade six inches taller, and his new height is making everyone expect more from him. Coach Mandrake wants to transform him from invisible science geek into star basketball player, even though Theo has little experience with the game. When Theo tries to hone his skills by playing pick-up ball in the park, kids are eager to include him at first; then they quickly see that he has no control of his gangly body. A girl named Rain even dubs him “Sasquatch.” To make matters worse, all his time spent on training is starting to hurt his science club’s chances of winning the “Aca-lympics,” the school’s trivia competition. Just when Theo thinks he can’t handle any more pressure, he’s accused of stealing. Can he find the real thief before he is kicked off the basketball and science club teams, or will his attempt at sleuthing be yet another air ball? (ages 8-12)

FEBRUARY

Streetball Crew Book Two Stealing the Game Hardcover by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (Author), Raymond Obstfeld (Author); Disney Hyperion
When eighth-grader Chris’s older brother, Jax, is caught betting on the pick-up basketball games that Chris and his friends play, Chris becomes involved in the police investigation. (Ages 9-12)

When Reason Breaks by Cindy L. Rodriguez; Bloomsbury
Elizabeth Davis and Emily Delgado seem to have little in common except Ms. Diaz’s English class and the solace they find in the words of Emily Dickinson, but both are struggling to cope with monumental secrets and tumultuous emotions that will lead one to attempt suicide. (Ages 12-18)

Dove Arising by Karen Bao; Penguin
On a lunar colony, fifteen-year-old Phaet Theta does the unthinkable and joins the Militia when her mother is imprisoned by the Moon’s oppressive government. (ages 12 and up)

Feral Pride by Cynthia Leitich Smith; Candlewick
The explosive finale to the Feral series by New York Times best-selling author Cynthia Leitich Smith. A rousing blend of suspense, paranormal romance, humor, and high action. (ages 12 and up)

Rebellion by Stephanie Diaz; St. Martin Press
Clementine, Logan, and their allies have retreated into hiding on the Surface, with plans to infiltrate each sector and weaken Commander Charlie’s infrastructure from within, but Charlie has more weapons in his possession than guns and bombs, and he will do whatever it takes to stop the rebels. (Ages 12-18)

Shutter by Courtney Alameda; Feiwel and Friends
With an analog SLR camera as her best weapon, Micheline exorcises ghosts by capturing their spiritual energy on film. She’s aided by her crew: Oliver, a techno-whiz and the boy who developed her camera’s technology; Jude, who can predict death; and Ryder, the boy Micheline has known and loved forever. 1(ages 12-18)

Gone Crazy in Alabama by Rita Williams-Garcia; Harper Collins/Amistad
Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern are off to Alabama to visit their grandmother Big Ma and her mother Ma Charles. Across the way lives Miss Trotter, Ma Charles’ half sister. The two half sisters haven’t spoken in years. As Delphine hears about her family history, she uncovers the surprising truth that’s been keeping the sisters apart. But when tragedy strikes, Delphine discovers that the bonds of family run deeper than she ever knew possible. Ages 8-12.

Listen, Slowly by Thanhha Lai; Harper Collins
Assisting her grandmother’s investigation of her grandfather’s fate during the Vietnam War, Mai struggles to adapt to an unfamiliar culture while redefining her sense of family. (ages 8-12)

My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warza; Balzer + Bray
Seventeen-year-old Aysel’s hobby–planning her own death–take a new path when she meets a boy who has similar plan of his own. (ages 12-18)

The Glass Arrow by Kristen Simmons; Tor Teens
Stolen from her home, and being groomed for auction, Aya is desperate to escape her fate and return to her family, but her only allies are a loyal wolf she’s raised from a pup and a strange mute boy who may be her best hope for freedom … if she can truly trust him. (ages 12-18)

This Side of Home by Renée Watson; Bloomsbury
Twins Nikki and Maya Younger always agreed on most things, but as they head into their senior year they react differently to the gentrification of their Portland, Oregon, neighborhood and the new–white–family that moves in after their best friend and her mother are evicted. (ages 12-18)

Birchtown and the Black Loyalists by Wanda Lauren Taylor; Nimbus
Wanda Taylor recounts the incredible story of the Black Loyalists of Birchtown. With educational and accessible language, she introduces young readers to the journey of Black American soldiers taken from Africa as slaves, their quest for freedom, the settlement and struggle of Black Loyalists on Nova Scotia soil, and the enduring spirit of their descendants in spite of a history marked by hardship and loss. Includes informative sidebars, highlighted glossary terms, recommended reading, historic timeline, an index and dozens of historical and contemporary images. (ages 7-12)

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind young readers edition by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer; Penguin
When a terrible drought struck William Kamkwamba’s tiny village in Malawi, his family lost all of the season’s crops, leaving them with nothing to eat and nothing to sell. William began to explore science books in his village library, looking for a solution. There, he came up with the idea that would change his family’s life forever: he could build a windmill. Made out of scrap metal and old bicycle parts, William’s windmill brought electricity to his home and helped his family pump the water they needed to farm the land.
Retold for a younger audience, this exciting memoir shows how, even in a desperate situation, one boy’s brilliant idea can light up the world. Complete with photographs, illustrations, and an epilogue that will bring readers up to date on William’s story, this is the perfect edition to read and share with the whole family. (ages 10 and up)

Wish Girl by Nikki Loftin; Razorbill
Peter Stone’s parents and siblings are extroverts, musicians, and yellers—and the louder they get, the less Peter talks, or even moves, until he practically fits his last name. When his family moves to the Texas Hill Country, though, Peter finds a tranquil, natural valley where he can, at last, hear himself think. There, he meets a girl his age: Annie Blythe. Annie tells Peter she’s a “wish girl.” But Annie isn’t just any wish girl; she’s a “Make-A-Wish Girl.” And in two weeks she will begin a dangerous treatment to try and stop her cancer from spreading. Left alone, the disease will kill her. But the treatment may cause serious, lasting damage to her brain.
Annie and Peter hatch a plan to escape into the valley, which they begin to think is magical. But the pair soon discovers that the valley—and life—may have other plans for them. And sometimes wishes come true in ways they would never expect. (ages 8-12)

MARCH
The Wicked Will Rise) Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige; HarperCollins
Everyone knows the Tin Woodman as Dorothy’s lovable sidekick, the tin man who longed for a real heart to beat inside his tin chest. This digital original novella is the fourth installment in the prequel arc to the edgy and thrilling New York Times bestsellers Dorothy Must Die and The Wicked Will Rise, and tells what happened to the Tin Woodman after he got his wish.

In The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the Wizard gave the Tin Woodman a heart, and all lived happily ever after—or so the story goes. But in Heart of Tin, the heart wants what the heart wants—and the Tin Woodman’s heart pines for Dorothy. The gift that the Wizard once bestowed on him turns twisted with longing. And when Dorothy returns to Oz with her own dark agenda, the Tin Woodman will do whatever it takes to help her rise to power—and to make her his.(ages 12 and up)

Three Day Summer by Sarvenaz Tash; Simon and Schuster.
Boy meets girl…at the most amazing concert the world has ever seen. Michael is unsure about most things. Go to college? Enlist in the military? Break up with his girlfriend? All big question marks. He is living for the moment and all he wants is a few days at the biggest concert of the summer.
Cora lives in the town hosting the music festival. She’s volunteering in the medical tent. She’s like that, always the good girl. But there is something in the air at this concert and suddenly Cora finds herself wanting to push her own boundaries.When Michael and Cora meet, sparks fly, hearts race, and all the things songs are written about come true. And all the while, three days of the most epic summer await them… (ages 12 and up)

The Smoking Mirror (Garza Twins vol 1) by David Bowles; IFWG Publishing
Carol and Johnny Garza are 12-year-old twins whose lives in a small Texas town are forever changed by their mother’s unexplained disappearance. Shipped off to relatives in Mexico by their grieving father, the twins soon learn that their mother is a nagual, a shapeshifter, and that they have inherited her powers. In order to rescue her, they will have to descend into the Aztec underworld and face the dangers that await them.

Billy Buckhorn Paranormal (Pathfinders series) by Gary Robinson; 7th Generation
Cherokee teenager Billy Buckhorn’s uncanny intuition became apparent at an early age. In the course of the Billy Buckhorn supernatural adventure books, Billy’s abilities grow and develop, and his reputation spreads throughout the Cherokee Nation. In book one, Abnormal, Billy began to experience an enhanced level of ESP after he survived being struck by lightning. His powers grow in Paranormal, the second book in the series, when Billy and his friend Chigger continue their adventures in a hidden cave they discover. After a horrifying accident at the cave, Billy’s supernatural abilities strengthen when he returns to life in the emergency room after being pronounced dead.
The story heats up when Chigger becomes possessed by an alien creature. Billy knows that all the trouble started in the cave and realizes he must return there in order to save his friend. What he doesn’t know is that the horned serpent known to the Cherokees as Uktena is lying in wait. (ages 12-16)

Walking Two Worlds by Joseph Bruchac and David Fadden (illus); 7th Generation
“Eee-leee! Master Parker,” Reverend Stone, headmaster at the Baptist school, called. “The answer, please.”
“Four,” Ely thought.
But he also thought something else. Why is English so strange? In Seneca every word always meant the same thing. But in English the same sound could mean different things. It could be four. Or for. Or fore. So begins this inspiring story of the early education of a famous Native American who gained greatness in the white man’s world while staying true to his Seneca people.Hasanoanda was his Indian name. But in mission school he became Ely. He encountered racism and deceit but, against all odds, did not give up on his quest to walk between two worlds. (ages 12-16)

Rivals in the City (The Agency series) by Y. S. Lee; Candlewick
Mary Quinn has a lot on her mind. James Easton, her longtime love interest, wants to marry her; but despite her feelings, independent-minded Mary hesitates. Meanwhile, the Agency has asked Mary to take on a dangerous case: convicted fraudster Henry Thorold is dying in prison, and Mary must watch for the return of his estranged wife, an accomplished criminal herself who has a potentially deadly grudge against James. Finally, a Chinese prizefighter has arrived in town, and Mary can’t shake a feeling that he is somehow familiar. With the stakes higher than ever, can Mary balance family secrets, conflicting loyalties, and professional expertise to bring a criminal to justice and find her own happiness?

Infinity Coil (the Ehrich Weisz Chronicles) by Marty Chan; Fitzhenry and Whiteside
Ehrich Weisz, Demon Hunter was introduced to steampunk fans in Demon Gate. Now, he is continuing his increasingly desperate quest to rescue his brother in an alternate universe in the sequel, Infinity Coil.
Now a fugitive from Demon Watch, young Ehrich Weisz hides in the underbelly of an alternate New York where immigrants from other dimensions mingle among Americans. Amid growing racial tensions, Ehrich searches for Kifo, the man who stole his brother’s mind and locked it inside an ancient medallion. He poses as a stage magician to draw out Kifo’s next target—the commissioner of Demon Watch. In the wings, an army awaits Kifo to accomplish his mission so interdimensional soldiers can invade New York. Ehrich is willing to risk the outbreak of war to save his brother, but he must decide whether or not he can betray his friends.

Mo’ne Davis: Remember My Name: My story from First Pitch to Game Changer by Mo’ne Davis; HarperCollins
In August 2014, Mo’ne Davis became the first female pitcher to win a game in the Little League World Series and the first Little Leaguer to be featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated, and a month later she earned a place in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. She was thirteen years old. (ages 8-12)

The Precious Ones by Marisa de los Santos; William Morrow
In all her life, Eustacia “Taisy” Cleary has given her heart to only three men: her first love, Ben Ransom; her twin brother, Marcus; and Wilson Cleary—professor, inventor, philanderer, self-made millionaire, brilliant man, breathtaking jerk: her father. Seventeen years ago, Wilson ditched his first family for Caroline, a beautiful young sculptor. In all that time, Taisy’s family has seen Wilson, Caroline, and their daughter, Willow, only once.
Why then, is Wilson calling Taisy now, inviting her for an extended visit, encouraging her to meet her pretty sister—a teenager who views her with jealousy, mistrust, and grudging admiration? Why, now, does Wilson want Taisy to help him write his memoir?
Told in alternating voices—Taisy’s strong, unsparing observations and Willow’s naive, heartbreakingly earnest yearnings—The Precious One is an unforgettable novel of family secrets, lost love, and dangerous obsession, a captivating tale with the deep characterization, piercing emotional resonance, and heartfelt insight that are the hallmarks of Marisa de los Santos’s beloved works.

The Memory Key by Liana Liu; HarperTeen
Lora Mint is determined not to forget.Though her mother’s been dead for five years, Lora struggles to remember every detail about her—most important, the specific events that occurred the night she sped off in her car, never to return. But in a world ravaged by Vergets disease, a viral form of Alzheimer’s, that isn’t easy. Usually Lora is aided by her memory key, a standard-issue chip embedded in her brain that preserves memories just the way a human brain would. Then a minor accident damages Lora’s key, and her memories go haywire. Suddenly Lora remembers a moment from the night of her mother’s disappearance that indicates her death was no accident. Can she trust these formerly forgotten memories? Or is her ability to remember every painful part of her past driving her slowly mad—burying the truth forever? Lora’s story of longing for her lost mother—and for the truth behind her broken memories—takes readers on a twisty ride. The authentic, emotional narrative sparks fascinating questions about memory and privacy in a world that increasingly relies on electronic recall. (ages 14 and up)

Catalyst by Lydia Kang; Penguin
In the past year Zel lost her father, the boy she loves, her safety, and any future she might have imagined for herself. Now she, her sister, and the band of genetic outcasts they’ve come to call their family are forced on the run when their safe house is attacked by men with neural guns. But on the way to a rumored haven in Chicago, Zel hears something–a whisper from Cy, the boy who traded himself for her sister’s safety. And when she veers off plan in order to search for him, what she finds is not what she expected. There’s more to their genetic mutations than they ever imagined…aspects that make them wonder if they might be accepted by the outside world after all. (ages 12 and up)

Written in the Stars by Aisha Saeed; Nancy Paulsen Books
This heart-wrenching novel explores what it is like to be thrust into an unwanted marriage. Has Naila’s fate been written in the stars? Or can she still make her own destiny? Naila’s conservative immigrant parents have always said the same thing: She may choose what to study, how to wear her hair, and what to be when she grows up—but they will choose her husband. Following their cultural tradition, they will plan an arranged marriage for her. And until then, dating—even friendship with a boy—is forbidden. When Naila breaks their rule by falling in love with Saif, her parents are livid. Convinced she has forgotten who she truly is, they travel to Pakistan to visit relatives and explore their roots. But Naila’s vacation turns into a nightmare when she learns that plans have changed—her parents have found her a husband and they want her to marry him, now! Despite her greatest efforts, Naila is aghast to find herself cut off from everything and everyone she once knew. Her only hope of escape is Saif . . . if he can find her before it’s too late. (ages 14 and up)

Under a Painted Sky by Stacy Lee; Putnam
Missouri, 1849: Samantha dreams of moving back to New York to be a professional musician–not an easy thing if you’re a girl, and harder still if you’re Chinese. But a tragic accident dashes any hopes of fulfilling her dream, and instead, leaves her fearing for her life.
With the help of a runaway slave named Annamae, Samantha flees town for the unknown frontier. But life on the Oregon Trail is unsafe for two girls, so they disguise themselves as Sammy and Andy, two boys headed for the California gold rush. Sammy and Andy forge a powerful bond as they each search for a link to their past, and struggle to avoid any unwanted attention. But when they cross paths with a band of cowboys, the light-hearted troupe turn out to be unexpected allies. With the law closing in on them and new setbacks coming each day, the girls quickly learn that there are not many places to hide on the open trail. (ages 12 and up)

Spirit Animals Book 7: The Evertree by Marie Lu; Scholastic
Everything comes to a head in this seventh book in the New York Times bestselling series. The world of Erdas will be changed forever. Conor, Abeke, Meilin, and Rollan were once ordinary kids. Then they discovered that they had spirit animals-wise and powerful partners who granted them with amazing gifts . . . and a legendary responsibility. Together, the team has journeyed across Erdas, racing to stop a merciless foe. They have laughed and fought together. They’ve won challenges and lost friends. Some have even lost themselves.Now that journey is about to end. They must reach a place forgotten by time and face off against an ancient enemy breaking free from his prison. They have just one chance to stop him . . . or the whole world will shatter. (ages 8-12)

The Boy Who Carried Bricks: A True Story by Alton Carter; Roadrunner
Abandoned by his father, neglected by his mother, shuttled between foster homes and a boys ranch, a young African-American man refuses to succumb to the fate that the world says should be his. Told by the man who lived it. (ages 12-18)

Tether by Anna Jarzab; Delacorte
Everything repeats. Sasha expected things to go back to normal once she got back on Earth. But now that she knows parallel worlds are real, and that an alternate version of herself exists in a world called Aurora, her old life no longer seems to make sense . . . and her heart breaks daily for Thomas, the boy she left behind. Troubled by mysterious, often terrifying visions and the echoes of a self she was just beginning to discover, Sasha makes the difficult decision to journey once more through the tandem.
Thomas is waiting for her on the other side, and so is strange, otherworldly Selene, Sasha’s analog from a third universe. Sasha, Selene, and their other analog, Juliana, have a joint destiny, and a new remarkable power, one that could mean salvation for Selene’s dying planet. With Thomas’s help, Sasha and Selene search for the missing Juliana. But even if they can locate her, is Sasha willing to turn her back on love to pursue a fate she’s not sure she believes in? (ages 12 and up)

The Sweetest Heist in History (Randi Rhodes Ninja Detective) by Octavia Spencer; Simon and Schuster
A hard-to-prove art heist makes a New York City mystery for ninja detective Randi Rhodes in this second book in a series full of humor, adventure, and heart from Academy Award–winning actress Octavia Spencer. Randi Rhodes and her fellow ninja detectives, DC and Pudge, were flying high after solving the Case of the Time-Capsule Bandit. But life in sleepy Deer Creek has begun to feel…a bit boring. There are no crimes to investigate! But a trip to New York City to visit Randi’s aunt changes that! While the ninja detective trio explores Randi’s old neighborhood in Brooklyn, they uncover an art heist. Except no one will believe them. So they’ll just have to catch the criminals in the act… (ages 8-12)

The Kidney Hypothetical: Or How to Ruin Your Life in Seven Days by Lisa Yee; Arthur A. Levine Books
Higgs Boson Bing has seven days left before his perfect high school career is completed. Then it’s on to Harvard to fulfill the fantasy portrait of success that he and his parents have cultivated for the past four years. Four years of academic achievement. Four years of debate championships. Two years of dating the most popular girl in school. It was, literally, everything his parents could have wanted. Everything they wanted for Higgs’s older brother Jeffrey, in fact.
But something’s not right. And when Higgs’s girlfriend presents him with a seemingly innocent hypothetical question about whether or not he’d give her a kidney . . . the exposed fault lines reach straight down to the foundations of his life. . . . (ages 12 and up)

APRIL
The Girl at Midnight by Melissa Grey; Delacorte
For fans of Cassandra Clare’s City of Bones and Laini Taylor’s Daughter of Smoke & Bone, The Girl at Midnight is the story of a modern girl caught in an ancient war.
Beneath the streets of New York City live the Avicen, an ancient race of people with feathers for hair and magic running through their veins. Age-old enchantments keep them hidden from humans. All but one. Echo is a runaway pickpocket who survives by selling stolen treasures on the black market, and the Avicen are the only family she’s ever known.
Echo is clever and daring, and at times she can be brash, but above all else she’s fiercely loyal. So when a centuries-old war crests on the borders of her home, she decides it’s time to act.
Legend has it that there is a way to end the conflict once and for all: find the Firebird, a mythical entity believed to possess power the likes of which the world has never seen. It will be no easy task, though if life as a thief has taught Echo anything, it’s how to hunt down what she wants . . . and how to take it.
But some jobs aren’t as straightforward as they seem. And this one might just set the world on fire

Tiger Boy by Mitali Perkins; Charlesbridge
When a tiger cub escapes from a nature reserve near Neel’s island village, the rangers and villagers hurry to find her before the cub’s anxious mother follows suit and endangers them all. Mr. Gupta, a rich newcomer to the island, is also searching—he wants to sell the cub’s body parts on the black market. Neel and his sister, Rupa, resolve to find the cub first and bring her back to the reserve where she belongs. The hunt for the cub interrupts Neel’s preparations for an exam to win a prestigious scholarship at a boarding school far from home. Neel doesn’t mind—he dreads the exam and would rather stay on his beloved island in the Sunderbans of West Bengal with his family and friends. But through his encounter with the cub, Neil learns that sometimes you have to take risks to preserve what you love. And sometimes you have to sacrifice the present for the chance to improve the future. (ages 8-12)

The Jumbies by Tracey Baptiste, Algonquin
Corinne La Mer isn’t afraid of anything. Not scorpions, not the boys who tease her, and certainly not jumbies. She knows that jumbies aren’t real; they’re just creatures parents make up to frighten their children. But on All Hallows’ Eve, Corinne chases an agouti all the way into the forbidden woods. Those shining yellow eyes that follow her to the edge of the trees, they couldn’t belong to a jumbie. Or could they?

Corinne begins to notice odd occurrences after that night. First she spots a beautiful stranger speaking to the town witch at the market. Then this same beauty, called Severine, turns up at Corinne’s house, cooking dinner for her father. Danger is in the air. Sure enough, bewitching Corinne’s father is the first step in Severine’s plan to claim the entire island for the jumbies. Corinne must call on her courage and her friends and ancient magic to stop Severine and to save her island home. (ages 8-12)

Gone Crazy in Alabama by Rita Williams Garcia; Amistad.
Newbery Honor winner and New York Times bestselling author Rita Williams-Garcia tells the story of the Gaither sisters, who are about to learn what it’s like to be fish out of water as they travel from the streets of Brooklyn to the rural South for the summer of a lifetime.
Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern are off to Alabama to visit their grandmother, Big Ma, and her mother, Ma Charles. Across the way lives Ma Charles’s half sister, Miss Trotter. The two half sisters haven’t spoken in years. As Delphine hears about her family history, she uncovers the surprising truth that’s been keeping the sisters apart. But when tragedy strikes, Delphine discovers that the bonds of family run deeper than she ever knew possible. Powerful and humorous, this companion to the award-winning One Crazy Summer and P.S. Be Eleven will be enjoyed by fans of the first two books as well as by readers meeting these memorable sisters for the first time. (ages 8-12)

None of the Above by I. W. Gregorio; Balzer+Bray
A groundbreaking story about a teenage girl who discovers she’s intersex . . . and what happens when her secret is revealed to the entire school. Incredibly compelling and sensitively told, None of the Above is a thought-provoking novel that explores what it means to be a boy, a girl, or something in between. What if everything you knew about yourself changed in an instant? When Kristin Lattimer is voted homecoming queen, it seems like another piece of her ideal life has fallen into place. She’s a champion hurdler with a full scholarship to college and she’s madly in love with her boyfriend. In fact, she’s decided that she’s ready to take things to the next level with him. But Kristin’s first time isn’t the perfect moment she’s planned—something is very wrong. A visit to the doctor reveals the truth: Kristin is intersex, which means that though she outwardly looks like a girl, she has male chromosomes, not to mention boy “parts.” Dealing with her body is difficult enough, but when her diagnosis is leaked to the whole school, Kristin’s entire identity is thrown into question. As her world unravels, can she come to terms with her new self? (ages 12 -18)

Taking Hold: From Migrant Childhood to Columbia Univesity by Francisco Jiménez; HMH
In this fourth book in his award-winning memoir series, Francisco Jimenez leaves everything behind in California—a loving family, a devoted girlfriend, and the culture that shaped him— to attend Columbia University in New York City. With few true accounts of the Latino experience in America, Francisco Jimenez’s work comes alive with telling details about the warmth and resiliency of family and the quest for identity against seemingly impossible odds.(ages 14 and up)

Endangered by Lamar Giles; HarperTeen
The one secret she cares about keeping—her identity—is about to be exposed. Unless Lauren “Panda” Daniels—an anonymous photoblogger who specializes in busting classmates and teachers in compromising positions—plays along with her blackmailer’s little game of Dare or . . . Dare. But when the game turns deadly, Panda doesn’t know what to do. And she may need to step out of the shadows to save herself . . . and everyone else on the Admirer’s hit list. (ages 12 and up)

Zeroboxer by Fonda Lee; Flux
Carr “the Raptor” Luka is a rising star in the weightless combat sport called zeroboxing. To help him win the championship title, the Zero Gravity Fighting Association assigns Risha, an ambitious and beautiful Martian colonist, to be his brandhelm—a personal marketing strategist. It isn’t long before she’s made Carr into a popular celebrity and stolen his heart along the way. But as his fame grows, Carr becomes an inspirational hero on Earth, a once-great planet that’s fallen into the shadow of its more prosperous colonies. And when Carr learns of a far-reaching criminal scheme, he becomes the keeper of a devastating secret. Not only will his choices place everything he holds dear into jeopardy, they may also spill the violence from the sports arena into the solar system. (ages 12 and up)

An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir; Razorbill
LAIA is a Scholar living under the iron-fisted rule of the Martial Empire. When her brother is arrested for treason, Laia goes undercover as a slave at the empire’s greatest military academy in exchange for assistance from rebel Scholars who claim that they will help to save her brother from execution.
ELIAS is the academy’s finest soldier— and secretly, its most unwilling. Elias is considering deserting the military, but before he can, he’s ordered to participate in a ruthless contest to choose the next Martial emperor. When Laia and Elias’s paths cross at the academy, they find that their destinies are more intertwined than either could have imagined and that their choices will change the future of the empire itself. (ages 14 and up)

The Way Home Looks Now by Wendy Wan-Long Shang; Scholastic
From the award-winning author of THE GREAT WALL OF LUCY WU comes a beautifully written and poignant story of family and loss, healing and friendship, and the great American pastime, baseball. Twelve-year-old Peter Lee and his family are baseball lovers, who bond over back lot games and talk of the Pittsburgh Pirates. But when tragedy strikes, the family flies apart and baseball no longer seems to matter. Is that true? Peter wonders if just maybe the game they love can pull them together and bring them back, safe at home. (ages 8-12)

Vietnamese Children’s Favorite Stories by Phuoc Thi Minh Tran illus by Nguyen Dong, THi Hop Nguyen and Dong Nguyen; Tundra

Vietnamese Children’s Favorite Stories, is a charming collection of fifteen tales as told by prominent storyteller Tran Thi Minh Phuoc. In it, Tran—Minnesota’s first Vietnamese librarian and an active member of the Vietnamese-American community—recounts cherished folktales such as “The Story of Tam and Cam” (the Vietnamese version of Cinderella), “The Jade Rabbit,” and “The Legend of the Mai Flower.” With beautiful illustrations by veteran artists Nguyen Thi Hop and Nguyen Dong, children and adults alike will be enchanted by Tran’s English retellings. Stories in which integrity, hard work and a kind heart triumph over deception, laziness, and greed—as gods, peasants, kings and fools spring to life in legends of bravery and beauty, and fables about nature. (ages 5-14)

Chook Chook: Saving the Farm by Wai Chim; Unversity of Queensland Press
The third book in the Chook Chook series set against the backdrop of rural China
It’s Chinese New Year, and for Mei and her family things are looking grim. It’s been another bad harvest and a disappointing year for their farm. And now, the government is building a major freeway that will rip right through their village and tear their little farm apart. One by one, Mei’s neighbors are convinced to sell their land and despite Ma’s and stepfather Jin’s best efforts to fight, it looks like their farm will be next. What can Mei and her beloved chickens, Little and Lo, do to save their farm and keep the family together? As the deadline for bulldozing draws near, villagers young and old will come to realize that it takes a village to save a farm. (ages 9-12)

The Girl at Midnight by Melissa Grey; Delacorte Press
For fans of Cassandra Clare’s City of Bones and Laini Taylor’s Daughter of Smoke & Bone, The Girl at Midnight is the story of a modern girl caught in an ancient war.
Beneath the streets of New York City live the Avicen, an ancient race of people with feathers for hair and magic running through their veins. Age-old enchantments keep them hidden from humans. All but one. Echo is a runaway pickpocket who survives by selling stolen treasures on the black market, and the Avicen are the only family she’s ever known.
Echo is clever and daring, and at times she can be brash, but above all else she’s fiercely loyal. So when a centuries-old war crests on the borders of her home, she decides it’s time to act.
Legend has it that there is a way to end the conflict once and for all: find the Firebird, a mythical entity believed to possess power the likes of which the world has never seen. It will be no easy task, though if life as a thief has taught Echo anything, it’s how to hunt down what she wants . . . and how to take it.
But some jobs aren’t as straightforward as they seem. And this one might just set the world on fire. (ages 12 and up)

Rogue (Talon Saga) by Julie Kagawa; Harlequin Teen
Ember Hill left the dragon organization Talon to take her chances with rebel dragon Cobalt and his crew of rogues. But Ember can’t forget the sacrifice made for her by the human boy who could have killed her—Garret Xavier Sebastian, a soldier of the dragonslaying Order of St. George, the boy who saved her from a Talon assassin, knowing that by doing so, he’d signed his own death warrant.
Determined to save Garret from execution, Ember must convince Cobalt to help her break into the Order’s headquarters. With assassins after them and Ember’s own brother helping Talon with the hunt, the rogues find an unexpected ally in Garret and a new perspective on the underground battle between Talon and St. George. A reckoning is brewing and the secrets hidden by both sides are shocking and deadly. Soon Ember must decide: Should she retreat to fight another day…or start an all-out war? (ages 12 and up)

Baddawi by Leila Abdelrazaq; Just World Books
Baddawi is a coming-of-age story about a young boy named Ahmad struggling to find his place in the world. Raised in a refugee camp called Baddawi in northern Lebanon, Ahmad is just one of the thousands of Palestinians who fled their homeland after the war in 1948 established the state of Israel. In this visually arresting graphic novel, Leila Abdelrazaq explores her father’s childhood in the 1960s and ’70s from a boy’s eye view as he witnesses the world crumbling around him and attempts to carry on, forging his own path in the midst of terrible uncertainty. Ahmad grows up in a crowded yet vibrant community amidst mounting unrest and violence in his host country, experiencing joys such as holidays and adventures with his friends, and facing heavy burdens, from a schoolyard bully to separation from his family during the Lebanese civil war. Ahmad’s dogged pursuit of education and opportunity echoes the journey of the Palestinian people, as they make the best of their present circumstances while remaining steadfast in their determination to one day return to their homeland. (ages 12 and up)

Saving Lucas Biggs by Maria de los Santos and David Teague; HarperCollins
Perfect for fans of Margaret Peterson Haddix, When You Reach Me, and Savvy, this charming time-travel story from husband-and-wife team Marisa de los Santos and David Teague follows one girl’s race to change the past in order to save her father’s future.

Thirteen-year-old Margaret knows her father is innocent, but that doesn’t stop the cruel Judge Biggs from sentencing him to death. Margaret is determined to save her dad, even if it means using her family’s secret—and forbidden—ability to time travel. With the help of her best friend, Charlie, and his grandpa Josh, Margaret goes back to a time when Judge Biggs was a young boy and tries to prevent the chain of events that transformed him into a corrupt, jaded man. But with the forces of history working against her, will Margaret be able to change the past? Or will she be pushed back to a present in which her father is still doomed? Told in alternating voices between Margaret and Josh, this heartwarming story shows that sometimes the forces of good need a little extra help to triumph over the forces of evil. (ages 8-12)

MAY
Penryn & the End of Days (End of Days series) by Susan Ee; Skyscape
End of Days is the explosive conclusion to Susan Ee’s bestselling Penryn & the End of Days trilogy. After a daring escape from the angels, Penryn and Raffe are on the run. They’re both desperate to find a doctor who can reverse the twisted changes inflicted by the angels on Raffe and Penryn’s sister. As they set off in search of answers, a startling revelation about Raffe’s past unleashes dark forces that threaten them all.
When the angels release an apocalyptic nightmare onto humans, both sides are set on a path toward war. As unlikely alliances form and strategies shift, who will emerge victorious? Forced to pick sides in the fight for control of the earthly realm, Raffe and Penryn must choose: Their own kind, or each other?
(ages 12 and up)

Emancipated by M. G. Reyes; HarperCollins
Emancipated by M.G. Reyes; Katherine Tegen Books
Six gorgeous teens, all legally emancipated from parental control, move into their dream house on L.A.’s infamous Venice Beach only to discover their perfect setup may be too good to be true. The roommates—a diva, a jock, a former child star, a hustler, a musician, and a hacker—all harbor dark secrets but manage to form a kind of dysfunctional family. Until one of them is caught in a lie and everyone’s freedom is put on the line. How far are they each willing to go to hide the past? And who will they betray to protect their future? Told from alternating points of view, Emancipated is the first book in a blistering guessing game of a series packed with intrigue, romance, and scandal. (ages 12 and up)

Tiny Pretty Things by Sona Charaipotra and Dhonielle Clayton; HarperTeen
Gigi, Bette, and June, three top students at an exclusive Manhattan ballet school, have seen their fair share of drama. Free-spirited new girl Gigi just wants to dance—but the very act might kill her. Privileged New Yorker Bette’s desire to escape the shadow of her ballet star sister brings out a dangerous edge in her. And perfectionist June needs to land a lead role this year or her controlling mother will put an end to her dancing dreams forever. When every dancer is both friend and foe, the girls will sacrifice, manipulate, and backstab to be the best of the best. (ages 12-18)

Bayou Magic by Jewell Parker Rhodes; Little, Brown
It’s Maddy’s turn to have a bayou summer. At first she misses life back home in the city, but soon she grows to love everything about her new surroundings — the glimmering fireflies, the glorious landscape, and something else, deep within the water, that only Maddy sees. Could it be a mermaid? As her grandmother shares wisdom about sayings and signs, Maddy realizes she may be only the sibling to carry on her family’s magical legacy. And when a disastrous oil leak threatens the bayou, she knows she may also be the only one who can help. Does she have what it takes to be a hero? (ages 8-12)

The Novice (The Summoner series) by Taran Matharu; Feiwel and Friends
In this trilogy launch, a blacksmith’s apprentice discovers he has the ability to summon demons. (ages 12-18)

The Tenderness of Thieves by Donna Freitas; Philomel Books
Jane is ready for a fantastic summer. In fact, she’s pretty sure the universe owes her one.
This past winter, Jane was held at knifepoint during an armed robbery and the specter of that night still haunts her. A summer romance with one of the town bad boys—sexy Handel Davies, who takes her breath away and makes her feel like a bolder version of herself—seems like the universe’s way of paying her back.
But bad boys always have secrets, and Handel’s secret just might shatter Jane completely. (ages 12 and up)

The Wrath and the Dawn by Renée Ahdieh; Putnam
Every dawn brings horror to a different family in a land ruled by a killer. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, takes a new bride each night only to have her executed at sunrise. So it is a suspicious surprise when sixteen-year-old Shahrzad volunteers to marry Khalid. But she does so with a clever plan to stay alive and exact revenge on the Caliph for the murder of her best friend and countless other girls. Shazi’s wit and will, indeed, get her through to the dawn that no others have seen, but with a catch . . . she’s falling in love with the very boy who killed her dearest friend. She discovers that the murderous boy-king is not all that he seems and neither are the deaths of so many girls. Shazi is determined to uncover the reason for the murders and to break the cycle once and for all.(ages 12 and up)

The Hunted by Matt de la Peña; Delacorte
When the Big One hit, Shy was at sea in style. The Paradise Cruise luxury liner he worked on was a hulking specimen of the best money could buy. And now it’s at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, along with almost all of its passengers. Shy wasn’t the only one to survive, though. Addie, the rich blond daughter of a mysterious businessman, was on the dinghy he pulled himself into. But as soon as they found the rest of the survivors, she disappeared.
The only thing that filled the strange void of losing her was finding Carmen, his hot coworker, and discovering a way to get back home. But Shy’s luck hasn’t turned. Not yet.
Back on the dinghy, Addie told him a secret. It’s a secret that people would kill for–have killed for–and she has the piece that could turn everything on its ear. The problem? Shy has no idea where Addie is. Back home in California seems logical, but there are more ways to die back home then Shy could ever have guessed. And thanks to what Shy now knows, he’s a moving target. (ages 14 and up)

P.S. I Still Love You by Jenny Han; Simon and Schuster
In this charming and heartfelt sequel to the New York Times bestseller To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, we see first love through the eyes of the unforgettable Lara Jean. Love is never easy, but maybe that’s part of makes it so amazing. (ages 12 and up)

The Most Beautiful Bully: Summit Middle School Book 1 by Shannon Freeman; Saddleback
Handling drama by yourself is never fun. New seventh grade student Carson Roberts learns the hard way not to cross the school bully, beautiful Jessa McCain. And it s only her first day! She’s also made two friends in quiet Emma Swanson and shy Mai Pham. But if there’s one thing Carson learns, it’s that baggage follows you. Middle school is the perfect storm of BFFs, frenemies, and mean girls. If you haven’t been frozen out, dumped, or betrayed, then you are lucky. Handling drama is never fun, especially when you’re alone. But some bonds of friendship are forever. (ages 8-12)

Silentious: Summit Middle School by Shannon Freeman; Saddleback
Mai Pham cannot wait to return to Summit after the holiday break. She remembers how she used to dread it. School was a lonely place. But now Mai has two besties: Carson and Emma. Ever since Carson showed up, life has been different. Mai’s new school ties don’t please her dad. Friendships are a distraction. Can Mai prove him wrong? Middle school is the perfect storm of BFFs, frenemies, and mean girls. If you haven’t been frozen out, dumped, or betrayed, then you are lucky. Handling drama is never fun, especially when you’re alone. But some bonds of friendship are forever. The Summit Middle School series tackles the challenging years before high school.(ages 8-12)

JUNE
Trollhunters by Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus; Disney-Hyperion
Everything changes for San Bernardino teenage suburbanite Jim Sturges when a 45-year old mystery resurfaces, threatening the lives of everyone in his seemingly sleepy town. Soon Jim has to team up with a band of unlikely (and some un-human) heroes to battle the monsters he never knew existed. (ages 12-18)

Ink and Ashes by Valynne Maerani; Tu Books
Claire Takata has never known much about her father, who passed away ten years ago. But on the anniversary of his death, she finds a letter from her deceased father to her stepfather. Before now, Claire never had a reason to believe they even knew each other. Struggling to understand why her parents kept this surprising history hidden, Claire combs through anything that might give her information about her father . . . until she discovers that he was a member of the yakuza, a Japanese organized crime syndicate. The discovery opens a door that should have been left closed. The race to outrun her father’s legacy reveals secrets of his past that cast ominous shadows, threatening Claire, her friends and family, her newfound love, and ultimately her life. Winner of Tu Books’ New Visions Award, Ink and Ashes is a fascinating debut novel packed with romance, intrigue, and heart-stopping action. (ages 12 and up)

The Dragon King by A. Yuan; Mithras
Safire has lived within a community of dragons for five years, ever since a band of raiders wiped out her village. When the King of Argrisia declares war on all remaining dragons, her community is forced to flee and she finds herself traveling with a small band of warriors to seek an oracle. Each of the five companions has their own secrets, which are revealed one by one as they travel. Safire finds that she is a changeling and has already developed the ability to transform into a dragon at will. When they reach the oracle, Safire is told that she may play a role in bringing the burgeoning conflict between dragons and humans to a peaceful conclusion. But her first step will be convincing her companions she can still be trusted in spite of her frightening abilities. Over the course of their journey to the dragon king’s mountain home on the orders of the oracle, all five travelers become united in their desire to see peace restored in the Midlands. But even peace will require sacrifice. (ages 14 and up)

Make it Messy by Marcus Samuelsson and Veronica Chambers; Delacorte
Marcus Samuelsson’s life and his journey to the top of the food world have been anything but typical. Orphaned in Ethiopia, he was adopted by a loving couple in Sweden, where his new grandmother taught him to cook and inspired in him a lifelong passion for food. In time, that passion would lead him to train and cook in some of the finest, most demanding kitchens in Europe. Samuelsson’s talent and ambition eventually led him to fulfill his dream of opening his own restaurant in New York City: Red Rooster Harlem, a highly acclaimed, multicultural dining room, where presidents rub elbows with jazz musicians, aspiring artists, and bus drivers. A place where anyone can feel at home. (ages 12 and up)

Shadowshaper by Daniel Jose Older; Arthur A. Levine
Sierra Santiago planned an easy summer of making art and hanging out with her friends. But then a corpse crashes the first party of the season. Her stroke-ridden grandfather starts apologizing over and over. And when the murals in her neighborhood begin to weep real tears… Well, something more sinister than the usual Brooklyn ruckus is going on. With the help of a fellow artist named Robbie, Sierra discovers shadowshaping, a thrilling magic that infuses ancestral spirits into paintings, music, and stories. But someone is killing the shadowshapers one by one — and the killer believes Sierra is hiding their greatest secret. Now she must unravel her family’s past, take down the killer in the present, and save the future of shadowshaping for generations to come.
Full of a joyful, defiant spirit and writing as luscious as a Brooklyn summer night, Shadowshaper introduces a heroine and magic unlike anything else in fantasy fiction, and marks the YA debut of a bold new voice. (ages 12 and up)

Delicate Monsters by Stephanie Kuehn; St. Martin’s Griffin
When nearly killing a classmate gets seventeen-year-old Sadie Su kicked out of her third boarding school in four years, she returns to her family’s California vineyard estate. Here, she’s meant to stay out of trouble. Here, she’s meant to do a lot of things. But it’s hard. She’s bored. And when Sadie’s bored, the only thing she likes is trouble.
Emerson Tate’s a poor boy living in a rich town, with his widowed mother and strange, haunted little brother. All he wants his senior year is to play basketball and make something happen with the girl of his dreams. That’s why Emerson’s not happy Sadie’s back. An old childhood friend, she knows his worst secrets. The things he longs to forget. The things she won’t ever let him.
Haunted is a good word for fifteen-year-old Miles Tate. Miles can see the future, after all. And he knows his vision of tragic violence at his school will come true, because his visions always do. That’s what he tells the new girl in town. The one who listens to him. The one who recognizes the darkness in his past. (ages 14-18)

Rid wit’ Me Part 2 by Joy Deja King; A King Production Presents A Young Diamond Book
The Romeo and Juliet of the streets are back in Ride Wit’ Me part 2. Mercedes and Dalvin are fighting to keep their love intact and make it down the isle. Will the two lovebirds be able to overcome their obstacles and finally become husband and wife? Find out in this next installment. (ages 12 and up)

Dork Diaries 9: Tales From A Not So Dorky Drama Queen by Rachel Renée Russell; Aladdin
Nikki’s diary is up to the month of April, and springtime is sure to bring more wacky adventures with Nikki and her friends Chloe, Zoey, and Brandon! (ages 9-13)

More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera; Soho Teen
The Leteo Institute’s revolutionary memory-relief procedure seems too good to be true to Aaron Soto — miracle cure-alls don’t tend to pop up in the Bronx projects. But Aaron can’t forget how he’s grown up poor or how his friends aren’t always there for him. Like after his father committed suicide in their one bedroom apartment. Aaron has the support of his patient girlfriend, if not necessarily his distant brother and overworked mother, but it’s not enough.
Then Thomas shows up. He has a sweet movie-watching setup on his roof, and he doesn’t mind Aaron’s obsession with a popular fantasy series. There are nicknames, inside jokes. Most importantly, Thomas doesn’t mind talking about Aaron’s past. But Aaron’s newfound happiness isn’t welcome on his block. Since he’s can’t stay away from Thomas or suddenly stop being gay, Aaron must turn to Leteo to straighten himself out, even if it means forgetting who he is. (ages 12-18)

JULY
Seeing off the Johns by Rene S Perez; Cinco Puntos Press
People in the small town of Greenton mark their lives from that day in late summer when crowds lined the streets to see off high school athletic stars John Robison and John Mijias. That was the day the Johns, as they were known by adoring fans in Greenton, left for state college, and never made it there—or back. The Johns had spent their high school years putting that nowhere losing town on the map with playoff runs in football and state championship bids in baseball. For Concepcion “Chon” Gonzales, the days that the Johns headed out and didn’t return was the first day of his new life. He had waited all his growing up years for a shot at Araceli when one of the Johns, John Mejia, stole her away. Now, while Greenton mourns, while the Johns’ families become actors in a spectacle of grief, while Johns memorabilia is sold in every gas station and convenience store in town, while Araceli has to endure a senior year in the watchful gaze of the whole town, Chon Gonzales makes his slow methodical move on the only girl he’s ever loved, hoping maybe that she won’t notice what he wants. (ages 12 and up)

August
Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx by Sonia Manzano; Scholastic Press
While there is enough paper to print books about the diversity that surrounds us, there are not enough books to reflect that diversity. There is no real reason beyond simple discrimination to limit books that reflect the diversity in sexual preference, gender identity, ethnicity or religion.
Honestly, not everyone enjoys or wants to read about middle class white characters who surround themselves only with other such characters. To deny that others might possibly find any ounce of reason to celebrate the existence of just one book, one unique book, reflects a lack in sense of civility, justice or equality. Books about queer black boys, about self centered white teens, about Latinos or Native Americans may not be everyone’s cup of tea; there may very well be many people who cannot comprehend the story beyond the diversity of the character, but there are those who can and they should be allowed to do so. (ages 12-18)

Show and Prove by Sofia Quintero; Knopf
The summer of 1983 was the summer hip-hop proved its staying power. The South Bronx is steeped in Reaganomics, war in the Middle East, and the twin epidemics of crack and AIDS, but Raymond “Smiles” King and Guillermo “Nike” Vega have more immediate concerns. Smiles was supposed to be the assistant crew chief at his summer camp, but the director chose Cookie Camacho instead, kicking off a summer-long rivalry. Meanwhile, the aspiring b-boy Nike has set his wandering eye on Sara, the sweet yet sassy new camp counselor, as well as top prize at a breakdancing competition downtown. The two friends have been drifting apart ever since Smiles got a scholarship to a fancy private school, and this summer the air is heavy with postponed decisions that will finally be made.
Raw and poignant, this is a story of music, urban plight, and racial tension that’s as relevant today as it was in 1983. (ages 12 and up)

Never Always Sometimes by Adi Alsaid; Harlequin Teen
Best friends Dave and Julia were determined to never be cliché high school kids—the ones who sit at the same lunch table every day, dissecting the drama from homeroom and plotting their campaigns for prom king and queen. They even wrote their own Never List of everything they vowed they’d never, ever do in high school.
Some of the rules have been easy to follow, like #5, never die your hair a color of the rainbow, or #7, never hook up with a teacher. But Dave has a secret: he’s broken rule #8, never pine silently after someone for the entirety of high school. It’s either that or break rule #10, never date your best friend. Dave has loved Julia for as long as he can remember.
Julia is beautiful, wild and impetuous. So when she suggests they do every Never on the list, Dave is happy to play along. He even dyes his hair an unfortunate shade of green. It starts as a joke, but then a funny thing happens: Dave and Julia discover that by skipping the clichés, they’ve actually been missing out on high school. And maybe even on love. (ages 12-18)

Ashes to Ashes by Jenny Han and Siobhan Vivian; Simon and Schuster
Think Mary, Kat, and Lillia have nothing left to lose? Think again. The fiery conclusion to the Burn for Burn trilogy from New York Times bestselling author Jenny Han and Siobhan Vivian.

They only meant to right the wrongs. It was about getting even. Burn for burn.But the fire they lit kept raging…Reeve ended up hurt, then Rennie ended up dead.Everything will turn to ash if they don’t stop what they started. But now that Mary knows the truth about what happened to her, will she want to?Secrets drew Lillia, Kat, and Mary together. The truth might tear them apart. (ages 12 and up)

Daughter of Dusk (A Midnight Thief Novel) by Livia Blackburne; Disney Hyperion
After learning the truth about her bloodlines, Kyra can’t help but feel like a monster.

Though she’s formed a tentative alliance with the Palace, Kyra must keep her identity a secret or risk being hunted like the rest of her Demon Rider kin. Tristam and the imprisoned assassin James are among the few who know about her heritage, but when Tristam reveals a heartbreaking secret of his own, Kyra’s not sure she can trust him. And with James’s fate in the hands of the palace, Kyra fears that he will give her away to save himself. As tensions rise within Forge’s Council, and vicious Demon Rider attacks continue in surrounding villages, Kyra knows she must do something to save her city. But she walks a dangerous line between opposing armies: will she be able to use her link to the Demon Riders for good, or will her Makvani blood prove to be deadly? In this spellbinding sequel to Midnight Thief, Kyra and Tristam face their biggest battle yet as they grapple with changing allegiances, shocking deceit, and vengeful opponents. (ages 12-18)

Finding Someplace by Denise Lewis Patrick; Henry Holt and Co.
Reesie Boone just knows that thirteen is going to be her best year yet-this will be the year she makes her very first fashion design on her Ma Maw’s sewing machine. She’ll skip down the streets of New Orleans with her best friends, Ayanna and Orlando, and everyone will look at her in admiration.

But on Reesie’s birthday, everything changes. Hurricane Katrina hits her city. Stranded at home alone, Reesie takes refuge with her elderly neighbor, Miss Martine. The waters rise. They escape in a boat. And soon Reesie is reunited with her family. But her journey back home has only begun. This is a story of a family putting itself back together, and a young girl learning to find herself. (ages 8-12)

Enchanted Air: Two Cultures Two Wings: A Memoir by Margarita Engle; Atheneum
In this poetic memoir, Margarita Engle, the first Latina woman to receive a Newbery Honor, tells of growing up as a child of two cultures during the Cold War. Margarita is a girl from two worlds. Her heart lies in Cuba, her mother’s tropical island country, a place so lush with vibrant life that it seems like a fairy tale kingdom. But most of the time she lives in Los Angeles, lonely in the noisy city and dreaming of the summers when she can take a plane through the enchanted air to her beloved island. Words and images are her constant companions, friendly and comforting when the children at school are not. Then a revolution breaks out in Cuba. Margarita fears for her far-away family. When the hostility between Cuba and the United States erupts at the Bay of Pigs Invasion, Margarita’s worlds collide in the worst way possible. How can the two countries she loves hate each other so much? And will she ever get to visit her beautiful island again? (ages 12 and up)

Shadows of Sherwood (Robyn Hoodlum series) by Kekla Magoon. Bloomsbury USA.
The night her parents disappear, twelve-year-old Robyn Loxley must learn to fend for herself. Her home, Nott City, has been taken over by a harsh governor, Ignomus Crown. After fleeing for her life, Robyn has no choice but to join a band of strangers-misfit kids, each with their own special talent for mischief. Setting out to right the wrongs of Crown’s merciless government, they take their outlaw status in stride. But Robyn can’t rest until she finds her parents. As she pieces together clues from the night they disappeared, Robyn learns that her destiny is tied to the future of Nott City in ways she never expected.
Kicking off a new series with an unforgettable heroine, readers will be treated to feats of courage and daring deeds as Robyn and her band find their way in this cruel, new world. (ages 8-12)

Billy Buckhorn Supranormal (Pathfinders) by Gary Robinson; 7th Generation
Billy Buckhorn’s uncanny intuition became apparent at an early age. In the course of this exciting series, Billy’s supernatural abilities grow and develop, and his reputation as a gifted “holy man” in the Old Way spreads throughout the Cherokee Nation. In book three, Supranormal, Billy and his grandfather face a deadly, ancient beast that’s poised to take control of the world. While Wesley and Billy summon aid from the spirit realms, Billy’s father, a college professor, puts together an archaeological team to help out—and to document the unprecedented things they’ve seen and experienced. But even with everyone pulling together, can they stop Uktena? (ages 12-16)

Fire Fight (Pathfinders) by Jacqueline Guest; 7th Generation
After her ikusin (grandmother) dies, Kai Hunter, a part Navajo, part Stoney Nakoda sixteen-year-old, runs away to Banff, Alberta, to avoid being placed in a foster home. Kai lies her way into a new identity, a job and a safe place to live. She makes new friends and volunteers with a rapid-attack crew for the forestry service. She even meets a great guy named Rory, who’s into motorcycles, just like her—and who seems to be into her too.
But Kai is scared of being found out, and she isn’t sure that she can trust all of her new friends…or that she likes the person she’s pretending to be. Meanwhile, she’s got to pay rent, figure out whether Rory is boyfriend material and assist the rap-attack crew as it faces a string of suspicious forest fires. In the thrilling conclusion to this romantic adventure, Kai’s choices become matters of life and death. (ages 12-16)

Moving Target by Christina Diaz Gonzalez;Scholastic Press
In this exciting and action-packed adventure by an award-winning author, a young girl discovers her secret ancient bloodline. The fate of her family, and the world, may rest in her hands… (ages 8-12)

Cassie Arroyo, an American studying in Rome, has her world ripped apart when someone tries to kill her father, an art history professor at an Italian university. Is she their next target?

Cassie sets out to uncover what is happening, only to learn that she is a member of an ancient bloodline that enables her to use the Spear of Destiny–a legendary object that can alter the future. Now running from a secret organization intent on killing those from her bloodline, Cassie must–with the help of some friends–decipher the clues that will lead her to the Spear. (ages 8-12)

September

Dream Things True by Marie Marquardt; St Martins Griffin
Evan and Alma have spent fifteen years living in the same town, connected in a dozen different ways but also living worlds apart — until the day he jumps into her dad’s truck and slams on the brakes.
The nephew of a senator, Evan seems to have it all – except a functional family. Alma has lived in Georgia since she was two, surrounded by a large (sometimes smothering) Mexican family. They both want out of this town. His one-way ticket is soccer; hers is academic success. When they fall in love, they fall hard, trying to ignore their differences. Then Immigration and Customs Enforcement begins raids in their town, and Alma knows that she needs to share her secret. But how will she tell her country-club boyfriend that she and almost everyone she’s close to are undocumented immigrants?

What follows is a beautiful, nuanced exploration of the complications of immigration, young love, defying one’s family, and facing a tangled bureaucracy that threatens to completely upend two young lives. This page-turning debut asks tough questions, reminding us that love is more powerful than fear.

Inker’s Shadow by Allen Say; Scholastic Press
As the school’s first and only Japanese student, he experienced immediate racism among his fellow cadets and his teachers. The other kids’ parents complained about Allen’s presence at the all-white school. As a result, he was relegated to a tool shed behind the mess hall. Determined to free himself from this oppression, Allen saved enough money to buy a 1946 Ford for $50 – then escaped to find the America of his dreams! In this follow-up to Drawing from Memory, Allen continues to reinvent himself as an author and illustrator. Melding his paintings with cartoon images and archival photos, Allen Say delivers an accessible book that will appeal to any reader in search of himself. (ages 12 and up)

Untwine by Edwidge Danticat; Scholastic
Giselle Boyer and her identical twin, Isabelle, are as close as sisters can be, even as their family seems to be unraveling. Then the Boyers have a tragic encounter that will shatter everyone’s world forever. Giselle wakes up in the hospital, injured and unable to speak or move. Trapped in the prison of her own body, Giselle must revisit her past in order to understand how the people closest to her — her friends, her parents, and above all, Isabelle, her twin — have shaped and defined her. Will she allow her love for her family and friends to lead her to recovery? Or will she remain lost in a spiral of longing and regret?

Untwine is a spellbinding tale, lyrical and filled with love, mystery, humor, and heartbreak. Award-winning author Edwidge Danticat brings her extraordinary talent to this graceful and unflinching examination of the bonds of friendship, romance, family, the horrors of loss, and the strength we must discover in ourselves when all seems hopeless. (ages 12 and up)

Everything Everything by Nicola Yoon. Delacorte.
My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.

But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly. Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster. (ages 12 and up)

The Suffering by Rin Chupeco. SourceBooks Fire.  When an old friend disappears in Aokigahara, Japan’s infamous ‘suicide forest,’ Tark and the ghostly Okiku must resolve their differences and return to find her. In a strange village inside Aokigahara, old ghosts and an ancient evil lie waiting. (ages 12 and up)

Hoodoo by Ronald L. Smith. Clarion Books.
Magic: hoodoo, as most people call it. But even though his name is Hoodoo, he can’t seem to cast a simple spell. When a mysterious man called the Stranger comes to town, Hoodoo starts dreaming of the dead rising from their graves. Even worse, he soon learns the Stranger is looking for a boy. Not just any boy. A boy named Hoodoo. The entire town is at risk from the Stranger’s black magic, and only Hoodoo can defeat him. He’ll just need to learn how to conjure first. Set amid the swamps, red soil, and sweltering heat of small town Alabama in the 1930s,Hoodoo is infused with a big dose of creepiness leavened with gentle humor. (ages 10-12)

Connect the Stars by Marisa de lost Sontos and David Teague; HarperCollins

When thirteen-year-olds Aaron and Audrey meet at a wilderness camp in the desert, they think their quirks are enough to prevent them from ever having friends. But as they trek through the challenging and unforgiving landscape, they learn that they each have what it takes to make the other whole.

Luminous and clever, Connect the Stars takes on some hefty topics of the day—bullying, understanding where you fit in, and learning to live with physical and mental challenges—all in a joyous adventure kids will love! (ages 8-12)

Rhythm Ride: A Road Trip Through the Motown Sound by Andrea Davis Pinkney; Roaring Brook Press
Berry Gordy began Motown in 1959 with an $800 loan from his family. He converted the garage of a residential house into a studio and recruited teenagers from the neighborhood-like Smokey Robinson, Mary Wells, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, and Diana Ross-to sing for his new label. Meanwhile, the country was on the brink of a cultural revolution, and one of the most powerful agents of change in the following decade would be this group of young black performers from urban Detroit. From Berry Gordy and his remarkable vision to the Civil Rights movement, from the behind-the-scenes musicians, choreographers, and song writers to the most famous recording artists of the century, Andrea Davis Pinkney takes readers on a Rhythm Ride through the story of Motown. (ages 10-14)

The Green Bicycle by Haifaa Al Monsour; Dial
Spunky eleven-year-old Wadjda lives in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia with her parents. She desperately wants a bicycle so that she can race her friend Abdullah, even though it is considered improper for girls to ride bikes. Wadjda earns money for her dream bike by selling homemade bracelets and mixtapes of banned music to her classmates. But after she’s caught, she’s forced to turn over a new leaf (sort of), or risk expulsion from school. Still, Wadjda keeps scheming, and with the bicycle so closely in her sights, she will stop at nothing to get what she wants.

Set against the shifting social attitudes of the Middle East, The Green Bicycle explores gender roles, conformity, and the importance of family, all with wit and irresistible heart. (ages 10 and up)

OCTOBER
Amphibians End: A Kulipari Novel by Trevor Pryce, Joel Naftali and Sanford Greene; Harry N. Abrams
In this third book of the Kulipari series, the future of the Amphibilands has never looked so bleak. With Lord Marmoo stronger than ever and still maniacally bent on taking over the outback, Darel can’t fathom why the Rainbow Serpent wants him to lower the Veil, the Amphibilands’ only source of protection. But the Serpent’s message is clear, and in preparation for the inevitable battle, Darel and the Kulipari go out in search of someone—anyone—to fight on their side.In their travels, the frog warriors make a perilous discovery: the outback’s water supplies are mysteriously disappearing. Without water, there can be no life. With the odds stacked against them, Darel and the Kulipari must take one final stand to protect their home, before it becomes . . . the Arachnilands. (ages 8-12)

The Kulipari trilogy comes to its thrilling conclusion in this action-packed adventure by NFL veteran Trevor Pryce and acclaimed comics artist Sanford Greene.

The Iron Warrior (Iron Fey series) by Julie Kagawa; Harlequin Teen
Waking after a month on the brink of death, Ethan Chase is stunned to learn that the Veil that conceals the fey from human sight was temporarily torn away. Although humankind’s glimpse of the world of Faery lasted just a brief moment, the human world was cast into chaos, and the emotion and glamour produced by fear and wonder has renewed the tremendous power of the Forgotten Queen. Now she is at the forefront of an uprising against the courts of Faery—a reckoning that will have cataclysmic effects on the Nevernever.

Leading the Lady’s Forgotten Army is Keirran himself: Ethan’s nephew, and the traitor son of the Iron Queen, Meghan Chase.To stop Keirran, Ethan must disobey his sister once again as he and his girlfriend, Kenzie, search for answers long forgotten. In the face of unprecedented evil and unfathomable power, Ethan’s enemies must become his allies, and the fey and human worlds will be changed forevermore.

The Rose Society (A Young Elites novel) by Marie Lu; G.P.Putnam’s Sons
Adelina Amouteru’s heart has suffered at the hands of both family and friends, turning her down the bitter path of revenge. Now known and feared as the White Wolf, she and her sister flee Kenettra to find other Young Elites in the hopes of building her own army of allies. Her goal: to strike down the Inquisition Axis, the white-cloaked soldiers who nearly killed her.

But Adelina is no heroine. Her powers, fed only by fear and hate, have started to grow beyond her control. She does not trust her newfound Elite friends. Teren Santoro, leader of the Inquisition, wants her dead. And her former friends, Raffaele and the Dagger Society, want to stop her thirst for vengeance. Adelina struggles to cling to the good within her. But how can someone be good, when her very existence depends on darkness?

Juba!: A Novel by Walter Dean Meyers; Amistad
This engaging historical novel is based on the true story of the meteoric rise of an immensely talented young black dancer, William Henry Lane, who influenced today’s tap, jazz, and step dancing. With meticulous and intensive research, Walter Dean Myers has brought to life Juba’s story. The novel includes photographs, maps, and other images from Juba’s time and an afterword from Walter Dean Myers’s wife about the writing process of Juba! (ages 12 and up)

Monster: A Graphic Novel by Walter Dean Myers, Guy A. Sims, Dawud Anyabwile; Amistad
A stunning black-and-white graphic novel adaptation of Walter Dean Myers’s Michael L. Printz Award winner and New York Times bestseller Monster, adapted by Guy Sims and illustrated by Dawud Anyabwile

Monster is a multi-award-winning, provocative coming-of-age story about Steve Harmon, a teenager awaiting trial for a murder and robbery. As Steve acclimates to juvenile detention and goes to trial, he envisions the ordeal as a movie. Monster was the first-ever Michael L. Printz Award recipient, an ALA Best Book, a Coretta Scott King Honor selection, and a National Book Award finalist. (ages 12 and up)

President of the Whole Sixth Grade by Sherri Winston; Little, Brown
Brianna Justice is determined to raise enough money for the big class trip to Washington, D.C., but she’s up against a lot: classmates who all pretend to be something they’re not, a new nemesis determined to run her out of office, and the sinking feeling she’s about to lose her two best friends. But just when she begins to lose hope, she comes to realize that sometimes surprises can turn out even better than the best-laid plans. (ages 8-12)

Trail of the Dead by Joseph Bruchac; Tu Books
In the sequel to the award-winning Killer of Enemies, Apache teen Lozen and her family are looking for a place of refuge from the despotic Ones who once held them captive and forced Lozen to hunt genetically engineered monsters. Lozen and her allies travel in search of a valley where she and her family once found refuge. But life is never easy in this post-apocalyptic world. When they finally reach the valley, they discover an unpleasant surprise awaiting them―and a merciless hunter following close behind. Hally, their enigmatic Bigfoot friend, points them to another destination―a possible refuge. But can Lozen trust Hally? Relying on her wits and the growing powers that warn her when enemies are near, Lozen fights internal sickness to lead her band of refugees to freedom and safety. Alongside family, new friends, and Hussein, the handsome young man whose life she saved, Lozen forges a path through a barren land where new recombinant monsters lurk and the secrets of this new world will reveal themselves to her . . . whether she wants them to or not. (ages 12-18)

The Toymaker’s Apprentice by Sherri L. Smith; G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Children.
Stefan Drosselmeyer is a reluctant apprentice to his toymaker father until the day his world is turned upside down. His father is kidnapped and Stefan is enlisted by his mysterious cousin, Christian Drosselmeyer, to find a mythical nut to save a princess who has been turned into a wooden doll. Embarking on a wild adventure through Germany, Stefan must save Boldavia’s princess and his own father from the fanatical Mouse Queen and her seven-headed Mouse Prince, both of whom have sworn to destroy the Drosselmeyer family. (ages 10 and up)

When the Slave Esperança Garcia Wrote a Letter by Sonia Rosa, trans. by Jane Springer, illus. by Luciana Justiniana Hees. Groundwood.
In 1770, the slave Esperança Garcia bravely penned a letter to the governor of Piauí state, in Brazil, describing how she and her children were being mistreated and requesting permission to return to the farm where the rest of her family was living. Before she wrote her letter, Esperança Garcia lived on a cotton farm run by Jesuit priests, where she learned to read and write — a rare opportunity for a woman, especially a slave. But one day she was separated from her husband and older children and taken with her two little ones to be a cook in the home of Captain Antonio Vieira de Couto, where she and the other slaves were beaten. In despair, she wrote to the governor about her terrible situation. She waited each day for a reply, never giving up hope, and although she never received an answer, she is remembered today for being the courageous slave who wrote the first letter of appeal in Afro-Brazilian Brazil. Commemorating the date of the letter’s discovery, September 6th has become Black Consciousness Day in Piauí state. This moving picture book provides a personal look at the tragic history of slavery. (ages 8-12)

The Donkey Lady Fights La Llorona and Other Stories / La Señora Asno Se Enfrenta a La Llorona Y Otros Cuentos by Xavier Garza; Arte Publico/Piñata Books
A collection of eerie tales about creatures from Mexican American traditions. (ages 8-12)

A Fighting Chance by Claudia Melendez Salinas ; Arte Publico/Piñata Press
A Latino boy facing challenges in the barrio struggles to make the right choices.

Night Moves by Richard Van Camp; Enfield and Wizenly
As a window into the magic and medicine of the Northwest Territories, Richard Van Camp’s fourth short story collection is hilarious and heartbreaking. A teenaged boy confesses to a vicious assault on a cross-dressing classmate; Lance tells the sensual story of becoming much closer to his wife’s dear friend Juanita; while a reluctant giant catches up with gangsters Torchy and Sfen in a story with shades of supernatural and earthly menace.
Night Moves continues to explore the incredible lives of Indigenous characters introduced in The Lesser Blessed, Angel Wing Splash Pattern, The Moon of Letting Go, and Godless but Loyal to Heaven. If this is your first time to Fort Simmer and Fort Smith, welcome. If it’s another visit—come on in: we’ve left the lights on for you.

NOVEMBER
Breath to Breath by Kevin Lew; Relish Media
Uprooted from his home and sent to live with his estranged father, seventeen-year-old William’s world is feeling tenuous at best. When he’s unexpectedly dragged into a situation in which he has no choice but to help an abused four-year-old boy, William’s world is rocked to the core as he discovers the truth behind the mysterious young boy’s stories of extreme sexual abuse. He and this boy are connected in ways William can’t even imagine and as horrible memories begin flood his consciousness, William’s rage drives him to steal a neighbor’s guns, convinced he must kill those responsible for causing a boy so much pain and betrayal. How William finds the love and compassion he needs to make the right choices is the heart and pulse of this riveting verse novel. Inspired by a true story, BREATH TO BREATH explores what hurt and healing really mean: to survive you hold your breath, but to live you must exhale.

For the Record by Charlotte Huang; Delacorte Press
As the new lead singer of the band Melbourne, Chelsea has only the summer tour to make the band–and their fans–love her, or it is back to boring high school. (ages 12 and up)

Seeing Off the Johns by Rene Perez; Cinco Puntos
For Concepcion “Chon” Gonzales, the year that high school athletic stars John Robison and John Mijias left for college and never made it was the beginning of a new life in his small town and the first time he understood about love. (ages 12 and up)

See No Color by Shannon Gibney; Carolrhoda Labs
Alex has always identified herself as a baseball player, the daughter of a winning coach, but when she realizes that is not enough she begins to come to terms with her adoption and her race. (ages 12 and up)

The Middle School Rules of Charles “Peanut” Tillman by Sean Jensen and Max Smith; Broadstreet Publishing 
A collection of stories from the childhood of Charles “Peanut” Tillman, who would grow up to play as a cornerback for the Chicago Bears and have his off-field work recognized with the 2013 NFL Man of the Year award. (ages 8-12)

In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse by Joseph Marshall and Jim Yellowhawk; Amulet Books
Teased for his fair coloring, eleven-year-old Jimmy McClean travels with his maternal grandfather, Nyles High Eagle, to learn about his Lakota heritage while visiting places significant in the life of Crazy Horse, the nineteenth-century Lakota leader and warrior, in a tale that weaves the past with the present. Includes historical note and glossary. (ages 10-14)

This Way Home by Wes Moore and Shawn Goodman; Delacorte
Elijah, seventeen, has always been sure of just one thing–basketball–and believes it will be his way out of West Baltimore, but when gang violence knocks him down, helping a veteran repair his rickety home helps Elijah see what really matters. (ages 12 and u

JANUARY
Vanessa’s Fashion Face-Off (Confidentially Yours) by Jo Whittemore; HarperCollins
Perfect for fans of The Cupcake Diaries and The Babysitters Club, this new series is about four best friends who are confidentially yours when writing their middle school newspaper’s advice column.

Vanessa Jackson has style to spare and an amazing ability to rock any look. She’s always had a flair for fashion, and dreams of being a designer one day. She’s loving middle school, and being on the newspaper staff with her two best friends is a blast. Vanessa knows her fashion advice is always on point for the group’s popular advice column.

But then she meets her new neighbor, Katie Kestler. Katie is cute, super-stylish, and just moved from glamorous LA. When Katie ends up attending the same middle school, suddenly it seems like Katie’s everywhere, and not in a good way. But when an advice-off competition threatens Vanessa’s spot on the column, she’s determined to take Katie down. (ages 8-12)

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