Springing Baseball On YA!

I really enjoyed A Strong Right Arm: The Story of Mamie Peanut Johnson by Michelle Green and thought I’d follow up with a few more baseball books.

The Indianapolis ABC’s history of a premier team in the Negro Leagues by Paul Debono The Indianapolis ABCs were formed around the turn of the century, playing company teams from around the city; they soon played other teams in Indiana, including some white teams. Their emergence coincided with the remarkable growth of black baseball, and by 1916 the ABCs won their first major championship. (adult crossover)

The Laura Line by Crystal Allen Tween readers who loved the warmth and humor Crystal Allen brought to How Lamar’s Bad Prank Won a Bubba-Sized Trophy will find the same winning combination in her new middle-grade novel, The Laura Line. Ages 8-12

Thirteen-year-old Laura Dyson wants two things in life: to be accepted by her classmates and to be noticed by ultra-cute baseball star Troy Bailey. But everyone at school makes fun of her for being overweight, and Troy won’t give her a second glance.

But a school assignment changes that. Laura is forced to learn the history of the slave shack on her grandmother’s property, and she discovers she comes from a line of strong African-American women. Through understanding her roots, Laura finds the self-esteem she’s been missing.

Mo’ne Davis: Remember My Name: My story from First Pitch to Game Changer by Mo’ne Davis In August 2014, Mo’ne Davis became the first female pitcher to win a game in the Little League World Series and the first Little Leaguer to be featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated, and a month later she earned a place in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. She was thirteen years old. (ages 8-12)

Baseball Saved Us by Ken Mochizuki Shorty and his family, along with thousands of Japanese Americans, are sent to an internment camp after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Fighting the heat and dust of the desert, Shorty and his father decide to build a baseball diamond and form a league in order to boost the spirits of the internees. Shorty quickly learns that he is playing not only to win, but to gain dignity and self-respect as well.

Baseball Saved Us is the ultimate rite of passage story. It will appeal again and again to readers who enjoy cheering for the underdog. (ages 6-12)

Home is Everything: The Latino Baseball Story: From the Bario to the Major Leagues by Marcos Breton and Jose Luis Villegas Roberto Clemente, Minnie Minoso, Orlando Cepeda, Miguel Tejada and José Santana. These men are the immortals, the pioneers, the famous, the soon-to-be famous and the forgotten ones. They know that home is everything—home is the barrio where they improvised baseball on unpaved streets and sandlots; home is home plate where the batter stands waiting for the next pitch, where runs are scored and games are won; and home is the magical ballparks of major league baseball where they dream to play. Villegas’ wonderful full-color photographs, with Breton’s companion bilingual text, reveal the essence of the Latino ballplayers’ journey: the struggles, dis-appointments and the sometimes enormous successes. The book features the journey of Miguel Tejada, All-Star shortstop for the Oakland Athletics, from his barrio in the Dominican Republic through his 2002 breakout year. The photographs let us witness the barrios where the dreaming begins, the young dreamers who will never leave their home, the major league facilities where young players learn English and gringo baseball, the forgotten players playing semi-pro in the Bronx and keeping their dreams alive, Latinos struggling through the foreign world of the minor leagues, the major leaguers and the immortals. (ages 12 and up)

Baseball in April and Other Stories by Gary Soto The Mexican American author Gary Soto draws on his own experience of growing up in California’s Central Valley in this finely crafted collection of eleven short stories that reveal big themes in the small events of daily life. Crooked teeth, ponytailed girls, embarrassing grandfathers, imposter Barbies, annoying brothers, Little League tryouts, and karate lessons weave the colorful fabric of Soto’s world. The smart, tough, vulnerable kids in these stories are Latino, but their dreams and desires belong to all of us. Glossary of Spanish terms included. (ages 8-12)

Awards: ALA Best Book for Young Adults, Booklist Editors’ Choice, Horn Book Fanfare Selection, Judy Lopez Memorial Honor Book, Parenting Magazine’s Reading Magic Award, John and Patricia Beatty Award

We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball by Kadir Nelson

The story of Negro League baseball is the story of gifted athletes and determined owners; of racial discrimination and international sportsmanship; of fortunes won and lost; of triumphs and defeats on and off the field. It is a perfect mirror for the social and political history of black America in the first half of the twentieth century. But most of all, the story of the Negro Leagues is about hundreds of unsung heroes who overcame segregation, hatred, terrible conditions, and low pay to do the one thing they loved more than anything else in the world: play ball. (ages 8 and up)

Using an “Everyman” player as his narrator, Kadir Nelson tells the story of Negro League baseball from its beginnings in the 1920s through its decline after Jackie Robinson crossed over to the majors in 1947. The voice is so authentic, you will feel as if you are sitting on dusty bleachers listening intently to the memories of a man who has known the great ballplayers of that time and shared their experiences. But what makes this book so outstanding are the dozens of full-page and double-page oil paintings-breathtaking in their perspectives, rich in emotion, and created with understanding and affection for these lost heroes of our national game.

April Releases

Tiger Boy by Mitali Perkins; Charlesbridge. (ages 8-12)
When a tiger cub escapes from a nature reserve near Neel’s island village, the rangers and villagers hurry to find her before the cub’s anxious mother follows suit and endangers them all. Mr. Gupta, a rich newcomer to the island, is also searching—he wants to sell the cub’s body parts on the black market. Neel and his sister, Rupa, resolve to find the cub first and bring her back to the reserve where she belongs. The hunt for the cub interrupts Neel’s preparations for an exam to win a prestigious scholarship at a boarding school far from home. Neel doesn’t mind—he dreads the exam and would rather stay on his beloved island in the Sunderbans of West Bengal with his family and friends. But through his encounter with the cub, Neil learns that sometimes you have to take risks to preserve what you love. And sometimes you have to sacrifice the present for the chance to improve the future.

Gone Crazy in Alabama by Rita Williams Garcia; Amistad. (ages 8-12)
Newbery Honor winner and New York Times bestselling author Rita Williams-Garcia tells the story of the Gaither sisters, who are about to learn what it’s like to be fish out of water as they travel from the streets of Brooklyn to the rural South for the summer of a lifetime.

Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern are off to Alabama to visit their grandmother, Big Ma, and her mother, Ma Charles. Across the way lives Ma Charles’s half sister, Miss Trotter. The two half sisters haven’t spoken in years. As Delphine hears about her family history, she uncovers the surprising truth that’s been keeping the sisters apart. But when tragedy strikes, Delphine discovers that the bonds of family run deeper than she ever knew possible.
Powerful and humorous, this companion to the award-winning One Crazy Summer and P.S. Be Eleven will be enjoyed by fans of the first two books as well as by readers meeting these memorable sisters for the first time.

None of the Above by I. W. Gregorio; Balzer+Bray. (ages 12 -18)
A groundbreaking story about a teenage girl who discovers she’s intersex . . . and what happens when her secret is revealed to the entire school. Incredibly compelling and sensitively told, None of the Above is a thought-provoking novel that explores what it means to be a boy, a girl, or something in between. What if everything you knew about yourself changed in an instant? When Kristin Lattimer is voted homecoming queen, it seems like another piece of her ideal life has fallen into place. She’s a champion hurdler with a full scholarship to college and she’s madly in love with her boyfriend. In fact, she’s decided that she’s ready to take things to the next level with him. But Kristin’s first time isn’t the perfect moment she’s planned—something is very wrong. A visit to the doctor reveals the truth: Kristin is intersex, which means that though she outwardly looks like a girl, she has male chromosomes, not to mention boy “parts.” Dealing with her body is difficult enough, but when her diagnosis is leaked to the whole school, Kristin’s entire identity is thrown into question. As her world unravels, can she come to terms with her new self?

Taking Hold: From Migrant Childhood to Columbia Univesity by Francisco Jiménez; HMH. (ages 14 and up)
In this fourth book in his award-winning memoir series, Francisco Jimenez leaves everything behind in California—a loving family, a devoted girlfriend, and the culture that shaped him— to attend Columbia University in New York City. With few true accounts of the Latino experience in America, Francisco Jimenez’s work comes alive with telling details about the warmth and resiliency of family and the quest for identity against seemingly impossible odds.

Endangered by Lamar Giles; HarperTeen. (ages 12 and up)
The one secret she cares about keeping—her identity—is about to be exposed. Unless Lauren “Panda” Daniels—an anonymous photoblogger who specializes in busting classmates and teachers in compromising positions—plays along with her blackmailer’s little game of Dare or . . . Dare. But when the game turns deadly, Panda doesn’t know what to do. And she may need to step out of the shadows to save herself . . . and everyone else on the Admirer’s hit list.

Zeroboxer by Fonda Lee; Flux. (ages 12 and up)
Carr “the Raptor” Luka is a rising star in the weightless combat sport called zeroboxing. To help him win the championship title, the Zero Gravity Fighting Association assigns Risha, an ambitious and beautiful Martian colonist, to be his brandhelm—a personal marketing strategist. It isn’t long before she’s made Carr into a popular celebrity and stolen his heart along the way. But as his fame grows, Carr becomes an inspirational hero on Earth, a once-great planet that’s fallen into the shadow of its more prosperous colonies. And when Carr learns of a far-reaching criminal scheme, he becomes the keeper of a devastating secret. Not only will his choices place everything he holds dear into jeopardy, they may also spill the violence from the sports arena into the solar system.

An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir; Razorbill. (ages 12 and up)
LAIA is a Scholar living under the iron-fisted rule of the Martial Empire. When her brother is arrested for treason, Laia goes undercover as a slave at the empire’s greatest military academy in exchange for assistance from rebel Scholars who claim that they will help to save her brother from execution.
ELIAS is the academy’s finest soldier— and secretly, its most unwilling. Elias is considering deserting the military, but before he can, he’s ordered to participate in a ruthless contest to choose the next Martial emperor. When Laia and Elias’s paths cross at the academy, they find that their destinies are more intertwined than either could have imagined and that their choices will change the future of the empire itself. (ages 14 and up)

The Way Home Looks Now by Wendy Wan-Long Shang; Scholastic. (ages 8-12)
From the award-winning author of THE GREAT WALL OF LUCY WU comes a beautifully written and poignant story of family and loss, healing and friendship, and the great American pastime, baseball. Twelve-year-old Peter Lee and his family are baseball lovers, who bond over back lot games and talk of the Pittsburgh Pirates. But when tragedy strikes, the family flies apart and baseball no longer seems to matter. Is that true? Peter wonders if just maybe the game they love can pull them together and bring them back, safe at home.

Vietnamese Children’s Favorite Stories by Phuoc Thi Minh Tran illus by Nguyen Dong, THi Hop Nguyen and Dong Nguyen; Tundra. (ages 6-12)
Vietnamese Children’s Favorite Stories, is a charming collection of fifteen tales as told by prominent storyteller Tran Thi Minh Phuoc. In it, Tran—Minnesota’s first Vietnamese librarian and an active member of the Vietnamese-American community—recounts cherished folktales such as “The Story of Tam and Cam” (the Vietnamese version of Cinderella), “The Jade Rabbit,” and “The Legend of the Mai Flower.” With beautiful illustrations by veteran artists Nguyen Thi Hop and Nguyen Dong, children and adults alike will be enchanted by Tran’s English retellings. Stories in which integrity, hard work and a kind heart triumph over deception, laziness, and greed—as gods, peasants, kings and fools spring to life in legends of bravery and beauty, and fables about nature. (ages 5-14)

Chook Chook: Saving the Farm by Wai Chim; Unversity of Queensland Press. (ages 9-12)
The third book in the Chook Chook series set against the backdrop of rural China
It’s Chinese New Year, and for Mei and her family things are looking grim. It’s been another bad harvest and a disappointing year for their farm. And now, the government is building a major freeway that will rip right through their village and tear their little farm apart. One by one, Mei’s neighbors are convinced to sell their land and despite Ma’s and stepfather Jin’s best efforts to fight, it looks like their farm will be next. What can Mei and her beloved chickens, Little and Lo, do to save their farm and keep the family together? As the deadline for bulldozing draws near, villagers young and old will come to realize that it takes a village to save a farm. (ages 9-12)

The Way Home Looks Now by Sendy Wan-Long Shange; Scholastic. (ages 8-12)
From the award-winning author of THE GREAT WALL OF LUCY WU comes a beautifully written and poignant story of family and loss, healing and friendship, and the great American pastime, baseball.
Twelve-year-old Peter Lee and his family are baseball lovers, who bond over back lot games and talk of the Pittsburgh Pirates. But when tragedy strikes, the family flies apart and baseball no longer seems to matter. Is that true? Peter wonders if just maybe the game they love can pull them together and bring them back, safe at home.

The Girl at Midnight by Melissa Grey; Delacorte Press. (ages 12 and up)
For fans of Cassandra Clare’s City of Bones and Laini Taylor’s Daughter of Smoke & Bone, The Girl at Midnight is the story of a modern girl caught in an ancient war.
Beneath the streets of New York City live the Avicen, an ancient race of people with feathers for hair and magic running through their veins. Age-old enchantments keep them hidden from humans. All but one. Echo is a runaway pickpocket who survives by selling stolen treasures on the black market, and the Avicen are the only family she’s ever known.
Echo is clever and daring, and at times she can be brash, but above all else she’s fiercely loyal. So when a centuries-old war crests on the borders of her home, she decides it’s time to act.
Legend has it that there is a way to end the conflict once and for all: find the Firebird, a mythical entity believed to possess power the likes of which the world has never seen. It will be no easy task, though if life as a thief has taught Echo anything, it’s how to hunt down what she wants . . . and how to take it.
But some jobs aren’t as straightforward as they seem. And this one might just set the world on fire.

Rogue (Talon Saga) by Julie Kagawa; Harlequin Teen. (ages 12 and up)
Ember Hill left the dragon organization Talon to take her chances with rebel dragon Cobalt and his crew of rogues. But Ember can’t forget the sacrifice made for her by the human boy who could have killed her—Garret Xavier Sebastian, a soldier of the dragonslaying Order of St. George, the boy who saved her from a Talon assassin, knowing that by doing so, he’d signed his own death warrant.

Determined to save Garret from execution, Ember must convince Cobalt to help her break into the Order’s headquarters. With assassins after them and Ember’s own brother helping Talon with the hunt, the rogues find an unexpected ally in Garret and a new perspective on the underground battle between Talon and St. George. A reckoning is brewing and the secrets hidden by both sides are shocking and deadly. Soon Ember must decide: Should she retreat to fight another day…or start an all-out war?

No Foolin’!

My excuse for not blogging is typically that I’m so busy at work. But really I think it’s because I’m not reading other blogs like I used to. I amaze myself with my ability to be surrounded with so many intelligent, productive and energetic people and many of them are bloggers. I get so much information and ideas from blogs. I still use Feedly to aggregate all my RSS feeds, so getting to what I want to read is not difficult. I’ve even been placing feeds for journals in there and can easily pull up any journal to which my library subscribes and read online.

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The garden opened last weekend and I’ve started m plants.

I’ve been busy with research, too.

I’m looking at concepts like multiliteracies, critical literacy and information literacy. Information literacy is what libraries teach about how to find locate, evaluate, create information and it’s way more complex that that makes it sound. It incorporates things likes copyright and citations and using databases and keyword searching and when/how to use Google Scholar…

Multiliteracy is, so far as I’ve seen, completely unrelated to information literacy but I don’t know that it should be. Multiliteracy is a concept that was developed by the New London Group and essentially tells us that literacy is about more than being able to read printed words. Its about being able to read and acquire information from emoticons, hairstyles, the interplay of words and images in a book, the use of colors in different cultures, signage… And, in reading this wide variety of text, in realizing the cultural variances in these texts, we then get into literacies such as critical literacy that requires us to enter a literacy experience on a peer to peer level with an author rather than viewing them as an expert. We question the choices they’ve made in what to include, or not include and look at the structure of power. Who is voiceless? How does one person or one group maintain power? Consider that in the book you’re currently reading and see how much more you get out of the story.

Since the late 1990s, educators have been incorporating these strategies into their classrooms and critical literacy is

I'm trying to get my 10K steps in everyday, trying to keep up with bloggers Zetta Elliott, Evelyn Alford and Kathy Burnette. Those ladies are rocking it!!

I’m trying to get my 10K steps in everyday, trying to keep up with bloggers Zetta Elliott, Evelyn Alford and Kathy Burnette. Those ladies are rocking it!!

still being taught. What I’m noticing is that typically, it’s taught in classrooms with high Latino and African American populations. I have to believe that for critical literacy to truly be relevant, white students have to be included as well. All citizens in a democracy need to understand who is entitled, who is disenfranchised, how those roles play out in society and what responsibilities we all have.

Wouldn’t in be interesting to develop a critical literacy lesson based upon an event on Twitter?

Books, images, texts, Tweets, blogs… INFORMATION is powerful!

News from USBBY’s March Update

NEWS ABOUT GLOBAL BOOKS FOR YOUNG READERS:

IBBY (International Board on Books for Young People) Regional Conference, October 16-18, 2015 in NYC:  The call for proposals to present a poster session at the IBBY Regional Conference in New York is now available on the USBBY (United States Board on Books for Young People) website.  The deadline for submission is May 1.  Details about the conference and registration material are also on the website (www.usbby.org).

International Children’s Book Day is April 2:  The USBBY website (www.usbby.org) has information about this year’s day and a resource guide with many ideas for ways to celebrate it.  The poster is available as a download on the site.  Some ideas for ways to celebrate include:  create a display of global children’s literature or books from the Outstanding International Books list;  feature a global author in a display; organize a book discussion of a global book; invite a local author or storyteller who has written a global book or is knowledgeable about global literature.

Toronto International Storytelling Festival Mar. 19-29 (www.torontostorytellingfestival.ca/site/)

Among the storytellers are international authors Bob Barton, Elizabeth Laird, Emma Donoghue, and Itah Sadu.

NEWS ABOUT GLOBAL BOOKS FOR YOUNG READERS:

IBBY (International Board on Books for Young People) Regional Conference, October 16-18, 2015 in NYC:  The call for proposals to present a poster session at the IBBY Regional Conference in New York is now available on the USBBY (United States Board on Books for Young People) website.  The deadline for submission is May 1.  Details about the conference and registration material are also on the website (www.usbby.org).

International Children’s Book Day is April 2:  The USBBY website (www.usbby.org) has information about this year’s day and a resource guide with many ideas for ways to celebrate it.  The poster is available as a download on the site.  Some ideas for ways to celebrate include:  create a display of global children’s literature or books from the Outstanding International Books list;  feature a global author in a display; organize a book discussion of a global book; invite a local author or storyteller who has written a global book or is knowledgeable about global literature.

Toronto International Storytelling Festival Mar. 19-29 (www.torontostorytellingfestival.ca/site/)

Among the storytellers are international authors Bob Barton, Elizabeth Laird, Emma Donoghue, and Itah Sadu.

2014 Canadian Children’s  Book Centre Awards: 

The TD Canadian Children’s Literature AwardThe Man with the Violin written by Kathy Stinson and illustrated by Dušan Petričić (Annick Press) 

Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award: How To by Julie Morstad (Simply Read) 

Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-FictionThe Last Train: A Holocaust Story by Rona Arato (Owlkids)

Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction For Young People: Graffiti Knight by Karen Bass (Pajama Press)

John Spray Mystery AwardWho I’m Not by Ted Staunton (Orca) 

Monica Hughes Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy:  Sorrow’s Knot by Erin Bow ( Levine/Scholastic)

Tall Tales and Short Tales: The Art of Uri Shulevitz:  The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, Massachusetts, will feature an exhibit of the works of Uri Shulevitz in celebration of his 80th birthday,  March 14 – June 14, 2015. This award winning author/illustrator was born in Poland, lived in France and Israel before emigrating to the United States.  Many of his books have international themes and settings.

book review: Can You See Me Now

9781558857834title: Can You See Me Now
author: Estela Bernal
date: Arte Publico; 2014
main character: Amanda “Mandy” Silva

Can You See Me Now is Estela Bernal’s first published novel. It’s the story of Mandy Silva whose father is tragically killed on her 13th birthday. Her mother blames Mandy for her husband’s death and proceeds to shuffle her daughter off to live with her grandmother. Grandmothers are good characters for books with family issues. They have the protagonist’s interests at heart but are far enough removed from the situation for their issues not with weigh down the story.

It seems Estela has always been the victim of school bullies, but a new girl, Paloma enters the school and easily becomes friends with Mandy. Rogelio, a nice enough boy with a weight problem and even more of a problem with bullies seems to become friends with Mandy and Paloma after a house fire. Does this sound like a book with too many issues, or just the way life is?

With a perception that makes her seem much wiser than her years, Mandy decides that the only way for her to heal her wounds is to begin to help others. And, so she does. Her road is a rocky one as we begin to experience the fullness of her character. With so much hurt and pain in this character’s life, Bernal manages to carry a gentle element of hope throughout the story. I almost hate to say that this book would be an excellent tool for counselors working with children who are overweight, being bullied or bullying others or for those experience grief because you’ll think this is an “issue book” filled with the author’s voice that directs young readers toward a more fulfilling life. And, that would be incorrect. Bernal let’s her character’s life play out, let’s her interact and react with other characters in ways that reflect real life situations. OK, Paloma was a bit didactic in explaining yoga to her friends, but it worked coming from this precocious young girl. Adults in the story were supporting characters who did not deliver messages on behalf of the author.

Can You See Me Now delivers a powerful message about taking control of one’s life by making good choices for ourselves, including the relationships we develop and maintain. An important, easy to miss message is how ordinary (i.e., not exotic) Latino life is.

This is a rather quick read that will leave you smiling.

book review: A Strong Right Arm: The Story of Mamie “Peanut” Johnson

web-AStrongRightArmtitle: A Strong Right Arm: The Story of Mamie “Peanut” Johnson
author: Michelle Y. Green
date: Puffin, 2002
biography

Writing a biography has to be difficult, particularly if the subject is still alive. This only increases the stress to get it right. And, this getting it right is not only about the facts! It means telling the story of this person’s life in a way that echoes the character by rebuilding scenes and scenery, schemes and themes that made the person who they were. Or are.

In writing the biography of Mamie “Peanut” Johnson, Michelle Green opted to tell the story in first person, giving readers the illusion that they are in the presence of Johnson and hearing directly from her. This can only add to the pressure to get it right.

She captures us with the very first paragraph.

“Mama never mentioned it, but I’m sure I musta been born with a baseball in my hand, it’s smooth white skin curving into my tiny brown palm. Ever since I can remember, my thoughts flooding back over sixty years now, my life has been wrapped up in that three-inch universe of twine and leather. It’s always been that way with me, and I expect always will be.” 

The story is framed with a phone call to Johnson from a reporter wanting to know how she feels about the County Stadium in Milwaukee being torn down and replaced. Her name is on a wall there that honors the Negro League Wall of Fame. Johnson played in the Negro Leagues with the Indianapolis Clowns.

I’d love to tell you the wonderful history I learned in reading this book, but I don’t want to spoil that for you. I will tell you that in Green’s writing, you experience the work of a gifted storyteller relating an interesting hole in history. It’s these hole’s that Green enjoys writing about.

Johnson’s story is full of acts of discrimination yet she has chosen to live out the good memories. While her early career as a baseball player would have been fraught with issues of sexism, it was actually racism that most often denied her possibilities. Green presents these acts in a manner that is straightforward but not overpowering to the story, one of personal achievement. Johnson’s photos are placed throughout the book, however in the paperback version I read they were small and poorly copied. As with any image, they did add to the richness of the story itself.

March is the time when many thoughts turn to baseball. This month, Mo’ne Davis: Remember My Name: My story from First Pitch to Game Changer by Mo’ne Davis (HarperCollins) is released. I can’t help but see parallels between these two. In looking for a biography of Johnson, I stumbled across an article about Johnson showing up to witness Davis as she planed in the Little League World series. “This girl is the best thing since food,” Mamie Johnson said.

Green’s book is pretty good, too! She writes a cohesive and engaging biography that gives readers insights into the scenes and scenery and the schemes and themes in the life of Mamie “Peanut” Johnson.

Free Audiobook: X A Novel

I’ve posted before about free summer audiobooks from SYNC. They’re getting an early start this year with a free download of the audiobook X: A Novel by Ilysasah Shabazz and Kekla Magoon. Here are the details:

On 5/14/15 a free MP3 audiobook download of the acclaimed YA novel X: A Novel by Ilyasah Shabazz (Malcolm X’s daughter) and Kekla Magoon will be available for one week.
Students who grab that file between 5/14/15 (8 AM EST) and 5/20/15  will be able to keep the spoken word performance of Malcolm X’s teenage years indefinitely.
When you share this news with teens in your circles, you can have them sign-up on the spot to get a text alert when the download file becomes available.  When they text to 25827 and put xnovel in the message field, they will get a prompt to grab an app to handle the download on 5/14/15.
There is more information & tools to share here: