YALSA 2016: Call For Proposals

from YALSA/ALA

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) is accepting proposals for continuing education sessions to be presented at the 2016 ALA Annual Conference in Orlando, June 23 – 28, 2016. Proposals may be submitted through June 1 via this form.

YALSA is accepting proposals for creative, innovative programs that address topics of focus in the Future of Library Services for & with Teens: a Call to Action report.

Proposals must fall within one of the following categories:

  • Teens/demographics
  • Collections
  • Spaces (physical and virtual)
  • Programming
  • Staffing
  • Youth Participation
  • Outreach
  • Administration/Policy

Individuals may submit multiple proposals; however, no individual will be chosen to present or co-present more than one program. Proposals that are largely sales pitches or that focus on only one particular product will not be accepted.  All presenters, moderators, speakers, etc. will be expected to cover their own travel and conference registration costs.  Most program time slots are 60 minutes in length.  However, there are a limited number of 90 minute time slots available.

The YALSA membership will vote on all of the programs that were submitted to determine which programs will move forward. Those who submitted proposals will be notified of their status the week of Sept. 1, 2015. You must be a member to submit a proposal. If you’re a librarian, join up! If you’re not team up with someone who is.

http://www.ala.org/yalsa/events

Free Books! Apply for the Great Books Giveaway

Need some new books for your YA collection? Consider applying for the Great Books Giveaway administered by YALSA. Each year, the YALSA office receives approximately 2000 newly published books, videos, CDs and other materials targeted primarily towards young adults. These are awarded to libraries that submit winning applications to the Great Books Giveaway. For more information, visit this page and review the guidelines below.
Guidelines

  1. Applicants must be personal members of YALSA as well as ALA. Organizational members are not eligible.
  2. All applications must be received complete in the YALSA office no later than December 1.
  3. All entries must include the cover sheet provided by YALSA.
  4. The application must be signed by the director of the public library, the superintendent of schools, the building-level administrator or the director of the institution.
  5. Applicants must agree to accept all the materials, understanding this collection is material targeted primarily for young adults, ages 12-18.
  6. The cover sheet, supplementary materials and an electronic copy of the current, board-approved collection development policy must be submitted via email by December 1. Incomplete applications will not be considered.
  7. Shipping and handling charges are the responsibility of the institution selected to receive the award.

This content originally appeared in an email from YALSA.

SundayMorningReads

Another small press to put on your radar: Brown Girl Publishing.

From their site:

Our Company: Brown Girls Publishing is a boutique publishing company, focusing primarily on digital content, while still providing printed books through Amazon. Our goal is to provide a voice for literary fan favorites, while introducing the next generation of authors.

Our Founders: Between them, National Bestselling authors, ReShonda Tate Billingsley and Victoria Christopher Murray have more than two million books in print. The dynamic duo decided to combine their respective talents in a highly popular series, in addition to their successful solo careers. So naturally, their next endeavor would be something near and dear to their hearts – helping build the next generation of authors, while at the same time, spotlighting some fan favorites. Victoria, a former successful entrepreneur, also holds an MBA from New York University. ReShonda is a former TV journalist and marketing professional with over 20 years of experience.

Beautiful summer weather this Sunday afternoon! I began my day in the garden and had my first harvest. I had so little on my ‘to do’ list yesterday, no more than to go to the market and to  read. The market here hasn’t even begun. And, the #weNeedDiverseBooks session at BEA was yesterday. I got myself to a diner to follow the tweets where I learned about plans for #WeNeedDiverseBooks to work with the National Education Association and First Book to plan a KitLit Diversity Expo in Washington DC in 2016. The jam-packed room resounded with support for the need for more diverse books and the momentum is just beginning.

No doubt it will take every day from now until then to plan the expo, but it will take everyone one of us being involved in kidlit to make it successful. Now more than ever is time to be present and any and every forum that relates to young adult literature, not just diversity. We have to continue showing up to stay part of the conversation. Join them on Twitter or Facebook if you can’t join in person.

As I reflect on the yesterday’s events, I considered two groups: librarians and young adults themselves.

I think it will be very hard for many young adults to express their desire for more books with characters like them. Those who do have a high level of awareness and will make extremely articulate cases for why we need more diverse books.

My own story is not unlike many of my generation, of not knowing I wanted books with black people until I’d found them. I grew up in Catholic all white schools and as an avid reader, I read whatever I could find. I remember going to the public library in the black neighborhood as a child. Black librarians (or were they clerks?) worked there but I do not remember books with black children then. I remember the good sisters giving me anthologies that contained stories and poems written by black authors and while I was initially embarrassed, I cherished those books and read them again and again. Probably in high school I found the Soul Brothers and Sister Lou. Definitely in high school I found Sammy Davis’ Junior’s Yes I Can and Margaret Walker’s Jubilee. I don’t remember any others, but I know the desire was there. Junior year I know I read Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen and Gwendolyn Brooks with some discomfort in my all white classes yet the topic I selected for my research project that year was LeRoi Jones.

Of course teachers need better training on cultural awareness, but the issue I’m looking at is the lack of books available to me in the library. What if I could have found them freely on my own? What if my classmates could have read books about black kids? Or Latina? Or Asian? How much more would we all have grown and developed? I can’t help but think that if I’d read more books with characters like me, I’d have found my voice sooner.

What experiences are young people of color today having with their reading selections? How many are able to find what they want? How many want more books with young people of differing color, nationality, sexual orientation or abilities? I remember how powerful Ari’s voice was and would like to hear from more young people.

I have to shake a finger of blame for the lack of diversity at my fellow librarians who continue to complain ‘the books are too hard to find’. I’m right here sharing book news as is Diversity in YA,  Rich in Color, and American Indians in Children’s Literature as is your library’s booksellers as is Amazon!! (hint: search young adult African American) Library shelves should reflect the diversity of America!

In April, the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) released “The Importance of Diversity in Library Programs and Material Collections for Children”.

“The white paper explores the critical role libraries play in helping children make cross-cultural connections and develop skills necessary to function in a culturally pluralistic society.  The paper calls for libraries to include diversity in programming and materials for children as an important piece in meeting the informational and recreational needs of their community.”

“The Future of Library Services for and with Teens: A Call to Action” was just released by the Young Adult Library Services whitepaper coverAssociation. The report affirmed that teens find libraries to be a safe haven, but it also reported on how many libraries are at risk of losing teen spaces. Who are these teens you ask?

“According to an analysis of the 2010 census data completed by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, there are currently 74.2 million children under the age of eighteen in the United States; 46% of them are children of color.14 All of the growth in the child population since 2000 has been among groups other than non-Hispanic whites.”

The report goes on to enumerate the many social issues confronting these teens and dynamic programs libraries across the country have developed not necessarily to address these issues but to address literacies this empowering teens through measures that are equitable and just.

And it starts with the books on the shelves that reflect the world in which we live.

Literacy. I haven’t talked tech in a while. Google scares me not because of their admitted lack of diversity but because Google continues to develop more and more Artificial Intelligence capabilities. Oh, it began with how they studied search patterns (knowledge seeking behaviors) it blossomed with Google Glass and thrives when we hear about Google devices in surgeries and now Google Nose?? Let’s keep our kids literate. Follow these stories and know how information and technology is being used in our world.  Let’s keep them reading! Let’s get them Binging it!

That beautiful sunshine has morphed into a dark gray sky, thunder and pouring rain. Diversity is beautiful.

 

 

GIVING you a lot if free information TUESDAY

Today is Giving Tuesday, a day for us all to take a time to remember the non-profits. I’m a bit tired of the gimmicky ways to help me spend money. Cyber Monday is silly because we don’t need to go to work anymore to have internet access for online shopping. Opening stores on holidays defeats the purpose of the holiday. There may be fewer days between Thanksgiving and Christmas, but the amount of money people have to spend is fixed as is the number of people we have to shop for. So much pressure to spend!!

Maybe someone will get creative and come up with Travel Thursday, a day for deep discounted travel. Perhaps I could then afford a midwinter vacation to Fiji to relax, to Jo’burg to explore or to Kaoshiung to visit old friends.

Do you take advantage of the “sales” on these days? Or use the reminder today to support a non-profit?

There does happen to be a lot of good stuff going on this week that won’t cost you a penny!

In the spirit of Giving Tuesday, YALSA is pleased to announce that from January 1, 2014, forward, all live webinars will be free to YALSA members!  To participate in the Jan. 16th webinar, “What’s Next for Teen Services,” sign up at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/TBTFQ56.  Thank you for all that you do for YALSA and have a great day!

NPR is running #NPRBlacksinTech from 2-20 December to call attention to the small number of Blacks who currently work in the technology field, A mere 5% of America’s scientists and engineers are Black, according to a 2010 study by the National Science Foundation.  Follow the discussion on Twitter, on NPR’s Tell Me More Blog or on Flipboard (I follow it here on my cell phone.) Last night, the conversation was about how to raise a coder.

I bet the @BlackGirlNerds are following this convo!! I recently discovered this group on Twitter and was introduced to so many new and interesting activities and events! I searched to see if there was a Latina and Asian girl nerd group. Though I did not see one, I did notice names that would imply not everyone following @BlackGirlNerds is Black. Nerds rock!

I will post a December list of new releases, please be warned that it is EXTREMELY short!! While I don’t post self published on the list (too many, too hard to find them all) I do have to mention that Zetta Elliott has gone back to self publishing and yesterday released “The Deep”. I’ve purchased my copy and I’ll review it here once I’m done with BFYA.

Speaking of BFYA, I’ve received a grant through the Indiana State University Center for Community Engagement that will provide funds for me to distribute over 700 books published from late 2012-2013 to needy high school libraries throughout the state of Indiana. If you are an IN high school librarian/media specialist, please apply! And, please spread the word!

Do you need great learning apps for your children or students? Check out these apps for recording learning.

Lawrence Public Schools is looking for America’s Outstanding Urban Educators.The Sontag Prize in Urban Education recognizes outstanding teaching in Mathematics, English Language Arts (ELA) and other disciplines. Educators chosen for the Sontag Prize will lead classes as part of the LPS Acceleration Academy, a program designed to provide targeted small group support for students. Not only is this an rare way to recognize outstanding educators, it’s also a good way for Lawrence Public Schools to attract quality educators.

A new feature on Google Scholar is Google Library.

You can save articles right from the search page, organize them by topic, and use the power of Google  Scholar’s full-text search & ranking to quickly find just the one you want – at any time and from anywhere. You decide what goes into your library and we’ll provide all the goodies that come with Scholar search results – up to date article links, citing articles, related articles, formatted citations, links to your university’s subscriptions, and more. And if you have a public Scholar profile, it’s easy to quickly set up your library with the articles you want – with a single click, you can import all the articles in your profile as well as all the articles they cite.

In the Margins committee will select and review the best books of the year for: multicultural youth (primarily African-American and Latino) from a street culture in restrictive custody  who may be reluctant readers.  Titles of interest will be unusual, possibly un-reviewed, have multicultural characters, dealing with difficult situations including (but not limited to) street life, marginalized populations, crime, justice, war, violence, abuse, addiction, etc.

Find more information about the committee here: http://www.youthlibraries.org/margins-committee

To nominate a title, nominate here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dERfNlAwOXMxSVJtbWw3amo2RXo0a2c6MQ

To apply to be on the committee next year, sign up here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dDZqR1RIQ0FQOGJkVTRJcmZoVWVfN1E6MQ

In the Margins Official Nominations, 2013

Asante, M.K. Buck. Spiegel & Grau. August 2013. 272p. HC $25.00. ISBN 9780812993417. A broken family and community are where he’s from;  poetry and music get him to where he wants to be.

Chris, Terry L. Zero Fade. Curbside Splender Publishing. September 2013. 294p. PB $12.00 ISBN 978-0988480438. How’s Kevin ever going to figure out his problems with girls, bullies, friends and the angst of seventh grade if his wise-assed mouth keeps getting him grounded?

Coley, Liz. Pretty Girl 13. Harper Collins. March 2013. 352p.HC $17.99. ISBN 9780062127372. She’s 16 but she can’t remember what happened the last 3 years.

Gagnon, Michelle. Don’t Turn Around. HarperCollins. August 2012. 320p. HC $17.99. ISBN 9780062102904. If you run, they will find you.

Goodman, Shawn. Kindness for Weakness. Delacorte. May 2013. 272p. HC $16.99. 9780385743242.

Greene, Robert and 50 Cent. 50th Law.  Smarter Comics. October 2012. 80p. PB $14.95. ISBN 9781610820066. Keys to power and words of wisdom.

Jacobs, John Horner. The Twelve-Fingered Boy.Carolrhoda Books.February 2013. 280p.  HC $17.95. ISBN 9780761390077. Jack’s hands aren’t the only things that hold secrets.

Johnson, Albert. H.N.I.C. Infamous Books. July 2013.128p. HC $11.95 ISBN 9781617752322. Will Black let Pappy get out alive?

Jones, Marilyn Denise. From Crack to College and Vice Versa. June 2013. 105p. ebook $9.99. ASIN: B00DH82HIA. The title says it all.

Kowalski, William. Just Gone. Raven Books. September 2013. 128p. $9.99 ISBN 9781459803275. The world contains strange truths.

Langan, Paul.  Promises to Keep. Townsend Press. January 2013. 151p. PB $5.95. ISBN 9781591943037.  Keeping his promise just might save his life.

Langan, Paul.  Survivor. Townsend Press. January 2013. 138p. PB $5.95. ISBN 9781591943044. Avoiding the past is not an option.

Lewis, John.  March Book 1 Top Shelf Productions.  August 2013. 128p. PB $14.99. ISBN 978-1603093002. ANNOTATION

Little, Ashley. The New Normal. Orca. March 2013. 232p. PB $12.95. ISBN 9781459800748. No hair, no sisters and stalked by a drug dealer. Where’s the upside to Tamar’s life?

McKay, Sharon E. War Brothers: The Graphic Novel. Illustrated by Lafance, Daniel.  Annick Press. 2013. PB $18.95. ISBN 9781554514885. Kidnapped and forced to kill for the Lord’s Resistance Army.

McVoy, Terra Elan. Criminal.  Simon Pulse. May, 2013. 288p. HC $16.99. ISBN 978144242622. Dee was everything to her. Until he killed a man for another girl.

Medina, Meg. Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass. Candlewick. March 2013. 260p. PB $16.99. ISBN 9780763658595. It’s gonna happen.

Miller, Kirsten. How to Lead a Life of Crime. Razorbill. February 2013. 434p. HC $18.99. ISBN 9781595145185.  Can Flick stay alive long enough to find out what’s really happening at Mandel Academy?

Nussbaum, Susan. Good Kings, Bad Kings. Algonquin Books. May 2013. 304p. HC $23.95.  ISBN 9781616202637.  Most of them could make it on their own – if they could get out of lockdown.

Rivera, Jeff. No Matter What. CreateSpace. October 2013. 112p. PB $3.95. ISBN 9781493544141. Will Jennifer wait for Dio? Will Dio get it together?

Shantz-Hilkes, Chloe (ed.). Hooked: When Addiction Hits Home. Annick Pr. March 2013. 120p. HC $21.95. ISBN 9781554514755. PB $12.95. 9781554514748. Living with addiction can be just as painful as suffering from one.

Stella, Leslie. Permanent Record. Skyscape. March 2013. 282p. HC $17.99. ISBN 9781477816394.  New School. Will Badi revert to his destructive ways?

Van Diepen, Allison. Takedown. Simon Pulse. September 2013. 288p. HC $16.99. ISBN 9781442463110. How many losses before Darren can takedown Diamond Tony’s organization?

Young, Pamela Samuels. Anybody’s Daughter. Goldman House Publishing.  November 2013. 374p. PB $16.99. ISBN 9780989293501 When Brianna gets targeted and tricked into a sex trafficking ring, Uncle Dre using his connections as a former drug dealer fights against time to save her.

Youth Communications. Rage:True Stories by Teens About Anger. Free Spirit. July 2013.176p. PB $11.99. ISBN 9781575424149. How to manage your anger, create a life of control and a future with possibilities.

Wells, Polly (ed.). Freaking Out: Real-life Stories About Anxiety.Annick Press. June 2013. 136p. $12.95. ISBN 9781554515448. From phobias to PTSD, how can you get over Freaking Out?

Zambrano, Mario Alberto. Loteria. Harper. July 2013. 288p. $21.99. ISBN 9780062268549. The cards help Luz remember the hand she was dealt.

 

 

 

Grant for Libraries in Need

BWI/YALSA Collection Development Grant:
Do you wish there was extra money to buy more items for your library’s teen section? Are your teens wishing they had a larger selection of materials at their public library? Then this might be your lucky day! The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) is now accepting applications for the BWI/YALSA Collection Development Grant. The $1,000 grant, made possible by BWI, will be awarded to up to two YALSA members to be used to support the purchase of new materials to support collection development in public libraries. The grant is also designed to recognize the excellent work of those YALSA members working directly with young adults ages 12-18 in a public library.

The committee is looking for proposals that present innovative ideas on how to expand young adult collections. Applicants will be judged on the basis of the degree of need for additional materials for young adults in their library, the degree of their current collection’s use, and the benefits this grant will bring to young adults. Other criteria, grant information and the application form can be found on the YALSA Awards and Grants website,http://www.ala.org/yalsa/awardsandgrants/bwi. Applications must be submitted online no later than December 1, 2013.

UpComing

The following are a few good ways to get involved in the dynamic world of YA.

ALAN, the Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of NCTE, is seeking applicants for the position of editor of their journal, The ALAN Review.  To apply, interested persons should submit the following: a letter of application detailing qualifications for the position and the applicant’s vision for the journal, a current vita, one sample of published writing, and a letter of general support from appropriate administrators at the applicant’s institution. Classroom teachers are eligible and encouraged to apply. Applications should be sent via email, using the subject line, ALAN Editor, to Teri Lesesne, Executive Director of ALAN (AlanExecutiveSecretary@gmail.com). Please send files as Word attachments. Applications must be received no later than October 1, 2013. Finalist interviews will be conducted at the NCTE conference in Boston.

Note that the TAR editor receives complimentary registration to the ALAN Workshop and a stipend of $2,000 a year.

Click here for further information about the position from ALAN’s Policy & Procedure Manual.

There is still time to register for the United States Board On Books International Conference in St. Louis MO, Oct. 18-20
Speaker highlights: Ashley Bryan, Mem Fox, Gregory Maguire, Pat Mora, Katherine Paterson, Peter Sis, Jacqueline Woodson
Breakout Session highlights (and there are many more):
“Bringing the World to Your Library: Incorporating International Books into Everyday Practice”
“Diverse Voices, Digital Narratives: Connecting Children, Books, and Digital Media  to Promote Bookjoy Around the World”
“PictureBookJoy: Humor in International Picture Books”
“Depictions of African American and Black Culture in Graphic Literature”
“Hair in Children’s Literature around the World”
“BookJoy for Middle School: Poetry in Many Voices”

___________

YALSA is seeking program proposals and paper presentations for its 2014 Young Adult Literature Symposium,Keeping it Real: Finding the True Teen Experience in YA Literature, to be held October 31 – November 2, 2014 in Austin, TX.   YALSA’s 2014 Young Adult Literature Symposium will gather together librarians, educators, researchers, authors and publishers to explore what’s ‘real’ in the world of teen literature.  In what ways is young adult literature reflecting the real and amazing diversity of today’s 42 million teens and it what ways has it fallen short?  Who are today’s teens, really?  What are the ‘real’ issues that they want and need to read about, and how do they want to read about them?  Why are realistic teen experiences in books sometimes controversial when they accurately portray a young person’s life? How are the evolving areas of identity and sex(uality) being explored in YA literature and nonfiction?  Join YALSA as we explore what is ‘real’ in young adult literature.

YALSA invites interested parties to propose 90-minute programs centering on the theme, as well as paper presentations offering new, unpublished research relating to the theme. Applications for all proposals can be found at http://ala.org/yalitsymposium  (click “Propose a Paper/Program”). Proposals for programs and paper presentations must be completed online by Nov. 1, 2013. Applicants will be notified of their proposals’ status the week of Jan. 12, 2014.

Important news from IBBY (International Board on Books for Young People)

In international children’s book news,  the 2013 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award,  sponsored by the Swedish government and currently the world’s largest award for children’s and young adult literature, has been presented to Isol, the Argentinian writer and illustrator of children’s books.  According to the ALMA website:  ” Isol’s great talent as a picturebook author is apparent in the overall experience created by the dramatic composition, the choice of colours and the intensity of the drawn line.”  (wwww.alma.se)

IBBY has selected the next editor for Bookbird .  Dr. Bjorn Sundmark will edit the journal from 2015- 2018.  He is Associate Professor of English at the Faculty of Education, Malmo University, Sweden, and serves on the board of the Swedish National  Culture Council.

Sunday Morning Reads

This post would have been up hours ago if I hadn’t been having Internet issues. Service just shouldn’t be so intermittent in one’s own home. I’m just sayin’

This may have been my last visit to the garden. I was surprised with a head of cabbage that I missed in previous visits and green peppers that just began to grow. I run through the photos on my phone and I’m just amazed at the growth that has taken place. This time, I didn’t even think to take any pictures. Growth happens whether we’re watching or not.

In recent years, there have been amazing blog posts that contain research relating to various facets of diversity in YA lit. Do publishers look at them? Are their decisions impacted at all by the data that is collected and analyzed? I work in a world that frowns on blogs and the information they relate as if it is all bogus forms of cheap entertainment. Knowing that, part of me wishes some of these research posts were submitted to journals, but I am so glad the information is made accessible to readers, authors, editors and publishers. Information is power. I think more impactful than where these reports are posted will be the replicated efforts that better document trends and hopefully change in the industry.

diversity_tinakugler

 

Can we try to collect these reports? Please leave a link to others in the comments.

I know there’s more! I’m sure Debbie Reese has collected figures, but I haven’t found anything…yet. Are there numbers on Latinos? Asians?

This 2008 article references a Brigham Young Study I’ll trying get a hold of this week.

The Brigham Young study analyzed the race, gender and family background of human characters in 82 Newbery-winning books through 2007. The analysis compared three periods, starting with 1922 through 1950, followed by the era in which the Civil Rights Movement gained momentum, 1951 through 1979, and concluding with the 1980 through 2007 period.

Black and Hispanic protagonists became scarcer during the past 27 years. American Indian and Asian main characters increased in number — to two each.

Latino protagonists disappeared from 1980 through 2007 and black ones fell to two from a high of five between 1951 and 1979, the study found. White main characters rose to 19 from 18 in the same period.

The last book with a Hispanic protagonist to win a Newbery Medal was “Shadow of a Bull,” by Maia Wojciechowska, in 1965. The book dealt with a young Spanish boy’s struggle to follow in the footsteps of his slain bullfighter father.

Books by authors of color and with characters of color aren’t written just for people of color. (Corollary: Books by white people aren’t written just for white people.) So, POC books and authors fight the good fight and show up anywhere and everywhere that readers can be found such as at book signings, local library events and conferences. Readers of color have to show up to.

Think about it.

If publishers and editors don’t see us at conferences and signings, their notions that we don’t read or buy books will only be re-enforced. Show up to these events, inquire about your favorite author of color. I say this out loud to remind myself why I’m going to ALAN this year and why I’m especially thankful that author Lyn Miller-Lachmann proposed a panel with her, myself, Kekla Magoon and Rene Saldana Jr. I think I saw names of three other authors of color in the program. So disappointing! I really hope to see more people of color than that in the audience.

If you’re a librarian looking for ways to get involved in ALA and make a difference, this information is for you.

Committees with openings:

and the Committee Volunteer Form (which requires you to sign in):

https://www.ala.org/CFApps/Committee/volunteerform/volunteerform2.cfm?group1=YALSA

YALSA has dozens of ways for its members and supporters to get involved, including many options for virtual participation.  Whether you choose to volunteer to gain additional leadership opportunities, build your resume, increase exposure in the association or library community, or give back to the profession, YALSA relies on you to help support the association and make a positive difference in serving teens through libraries.

Whichever way you choose to get involved, we are committed to providing you with a meaningful experience.  If you have any questions, or would like additional information, we’re happy to help!  Email us at yalsa@ala.org or call us at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 4390.

And yes, dammit! There are malls in Kenya! And paved roads, car dealerships, universities, banks and yes, even book publishers! I remember when The Cold War between the US, Russia and China played out in Africa and now it’s this ‘war’ between… who is this between? Who are the players? These extremists in the East and in the West? It’s playing out all over Africa, from Mali to Kenya and to Somalia. Great people to follow from various locations across the continent to keep you aware of mostly literary and a few political occurences.

Storymoja Hay Fest@SMHayFest

Kinna@kinnareads

Writers Project Gh@writersPG

African Library Proj ‏ @AfricanLibraryP

Jalada Africa ‏ @JaladaAfrica

I’m thinking about mooncakes and Moon Festival while my friends in Taiwan are just getting over a massive typhoon.

Bless the people of Kenya who are mourning and grieving. Bless the people of Taiwan who should be celebrating the autumn moon festival but are suffering from a massive typhoon. Even from these tragedies, there will eventually be growth; god willing!

Bless us!